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Quantifying urbanisation as a risk factor for non-communicable disease

Allender, Steven, Wickramasinghe, Kremlin, Goldacre, Michael, Matthews, David and Katulanda, Prasad 2011, Quantifying urbanisation as a risk factor for non-communicable disease, Journal of urban health, vol. 88, no. 5, pp. 906-918.

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Title Quantifying urbanisation as a risk factor for non-communicable disease
Author(s) Allender, Steven
Wickramasinghe, Kremlin
Goldacre, Michael
Matthews, David
Katulanda, Prasad
Journal name Journal of urban health
Volume number 88
Issue number 5
Start page 906
End page 918
Total pages 13
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1099-3460
1468-2869
Keyword(s) Urbanization
non communicable disease
Sri Lanka
Summary Aim of this study was to investigate the poorly understood relationship between the process of urbanization and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Sri Lanka using a multi-component, quantitative measure of urbanicity.

NCD prevalence data were taken from the Sri Lankan Diabetes and Cardiovascular Study comprising a representative sample of people from seven of the nine provinces in Sri Lanka (n=4,485/5,000; response rate=89.7%). We constructed a measure of the urban environment for seven areas using a seven-item scale based on data from study clusters to develop an ―urbanicity” scale. The items were population size, population density, and access to markets, transportation, communications/media, economic factors, environment/sanitation, health, education, and housing quality. Linear and logistic regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between urbanicity and chronic disease risk factors.

Among men, urbanicity was positively associated with physical inactivity (OR: 3.22; 2.27 – 4.57), high body mass index (OR: 2.45; 95% CI: 1.88 – 3.20) and diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.66 – 3.57). Among women, too, urbanicity was positively associated with physical inactivity (OR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.64 – 3.21), high body mass index (OR: 2.92;95% CI: 2.41 – 3.55) and diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.58 – 2.80).

There is a clear relationship between urbanicity and common modifiable risk factors for chronic disease in a representative sample of Sri Lankan adults.
Language eng
Field of Research 111708 Health and Community Services
Socio Economic Objective 920207 Health Policy Economic Outcomes
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035922

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.