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Exploring barriers in expertise seeking : why don't they ask an expert?

Helms, R. W., Diemer, D. and Lichtenstein, S. 2011, Exploring barriers in expertise seeking : why don't they ask an expert?, in PACIS 2011 : Proceedings of the 15th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld., pp. 1-13.

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Title Exploring barriers in expertise seeking : why don't they ask an expert?
Author(s) Helms, R. W.
Diemer, D.
Lichtenstein, S.
Conference name Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (15th : 2011 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 7-11 July 2011
Title of proceedings PACIS 2011 : Proceedings of the 15th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher University of Queensland
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Keyword(s) knowledge seeking
expertise seeking
knowledge sharing
knowledge seeking barriers
advice networks
Summary This paper reports findings from a research project that explores reasons why some employees prefer to seek expertise to resolve work-related problems from direct colleagues rather than designated internal experts. Several studies suggest that while an expert generally provides a higher quality solution in a shorter time, workers tend to ask friendly or proximate colleagues to help with knowledge-based problems at work. Prior research provides only fragmented insights into understanding the barriers to asking a designated internal expert for help at work. To address this gap, we asked post-graduate students enrolled in a knowledge management subject at a large Australian university to share their perspectives in an online discussion forum. Content analysis of the collected perspectives enabled identification of twenty-one factors that may limit the seeking of expertise from a designated internal expert. The factors are grouped in four categories: environment, accessibility, communication and personality. In addition one context variable is described, determining the extent to which the barriers are influential in a specific situation. By synthesising the results, we have proposed two models of expertise-seeking barriers. A literature review helps validate the barriers identified by the study. Key theoretical and practical implications are also discussed.
Notes Conference proceedings : http://projects.business.uq.edu.au/pacis2011/
Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in Deakin Research Online. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au

Language eng
Field of Research 080609 Information Systems Management
Socio Economic Objective 890399 Information Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, PACIS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036178

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.