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Direction-specific diaphyseal geometry and mineral mass distribution of tibia and fibula: A pQCT study of female athletes representing different exercise loading types

Rantalainen, T., Nikander, R., Heinonen, A., Suominen, H. and Sievanen, H. 2010, Direction-specific diaphyseal geometry and mineral mass distribution of tibia and fibula: A pQCT study of female athletes representing different exercise loading types, Calcified tissue international, vol. 86, no. 6, pp. 447-454, doi: 10.1007/s00223-010-9358-z.

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Title Direction-specific diaphyseal geometry and mineral mass distribution of tibia and fibula: A pQCT study of female athletes representing different exercise loading types
Author(s) Rantalainen, T.ORCID iD for Rantalainen, T. orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-4782
Nikander, R.
Heinonen, A.
Suominen, H.
Sievanen, H.
Journal name Calcified tissue international
Volume number 86
Issue number 6
Start page 447
End page 454
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer New York
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2010-04-10
ISSN 0171-967X
1432-0827
Keyword(s) skeletal adaptation
young adult
bone rigidity
bone geometry
muscle
Summary Bones adapt to prevalent loading, which comprises mainly forces caused by muscle contractions. Therefore, we hypothesized that similar associations would be observed between neuromuscular performance and rigidity of bones located in the same body segment. These associations were assessed among 221 premenopausal women representing athletes in high-impact, odd-impact, highmagnitude, repetitive low-impact, and repetitive nonimpact sports and physically active referents aged 17–40 years. The whole group mean age and body mass were 23 (5) and 63 (9) kg, respectively. Bone cross sections at the tibial and fibular mid-diaphysis were assessed with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Density-weighted polar section modulus (SSI) and minimal and maximal crosssectional moments of inertia (Imin, Imax) were analyzed. Bone morphology was described as the Imax/Imin ratio. Neuromuscular performance was assessed by maximal power during countermovement jump (CMJ). Tibial SSI was 31% higher in the high-impact, 19% in the odd-impact, and 30% in the repetitive low-impact groups compared with the reference group (P\0.005). Only the high-impact group differed from the referents in fibular SSI (17%, P\0.005). Tibial morphology differed between groups (P = 0.001), but fibular morphology did not (P = 0.247). The bone-bygroup interaction was highly significant (P\0.001). After controlling for height, weight, and age, the CMJ peak power correlated moderately with tibial SSI (r = 0.31, P\0.001) but not with fibular SSI (r = 0.069, P = 0.313). In conclusion, observed differences in the association between neuromuscular performance and tibial and fibular traits suggest
that the tibia and fibula experience different loading
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00223-010-9358-z
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Springer Science+Business Media
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036199

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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