Conceptualizing social influence in the ubiquitous computing era : technology adoption and use in multiple use contexts

Zeal, Jay, Smith, Stephen P. and Scheepers, Rens 2010, Conceptualizing social influence in the ubiquitous computing era : technology adoption and use in multiple use contexts, in Information Technology: Gateway to the Future; 31st International Conference on Information Systems, International Conference on Information Systems, [St Louis, Mo.].

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Title Conceptualizing social influence in the ubiquitous computing era : technology adoption and use in multiple use contexts
Author(s) Zeal, Jay
Smith, Stephen P.
Scheepers, Rens
Conference name International Conference on Information Systems (31st : 2010 : St Louis, Mo.)
Conference location St Louis, Mo.
Conference dates 12-15 Dec. 2010
Title of proceedings Information Technology: Gateway to the Future; 31st International Conference on Information Systems
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series International Conference on Information Systems
Publisher International Conference on Information Systems
Place of publication [St Louis, Mo.]
Keyword(s) social influence
technology acceptance model
ubiquitous computing
Summary Ubiquitous and mobile computing has increased the level of social connectedness. In an era where technology has permeated into spaces of work, play and socializing, social influence has become an important consideration. The operationalization of the social influence construct in the technology adoption and use literature often assumes singular technology use contexts and purposes. We question whether social influence, as operationalized in IS, is reflective of the utilitarian, hedonic and social environment that many individuals operate in. We propose a framework to consider social influence more inclusively, drawing on differences in referent power and levels of expertise. We outline our research approach within the demographic segment of young working professionals. Research in this area is necessary to improve theoretical explanations of adoptive behavior of these technologies. We hope to contribute by suggesting a richer, more encompassing operationalization of the social influence construct for future IS research.
ISBN 9780615418988
Language eng
Field of Research 080699 Information Systems not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2010, ICIS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036288

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Information and Business Analytics
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