MAAGs: the next generation. A study of the development of medical audit advisory groups and the arrangements for supporting clinical audit in primary care

Speight, Jane 1998, MAAGs: the next generation. A study of the development of medical audit advisory groups and the arrangements for supporting clinical audit in primary care, Audit trends, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 43-49.


Title MAAGs: the next generation. A study of the development of medical audit advisory groups and the arrangements for supporting clinical audit in primary care
Author(s) Speight, Jane
Journal name Audit trends
Volume number 6
Issue number 2
Start page 43
End page 49
Publisher Eli Lilley National Clinical Audit Centre
Place of publication Leicester, England
Publication date 1998
ISSN 1352-7797
Keyword(s) employment
health care financing
health care organization
medical audit
primary medical care
questionnaire
United Kingdom
Summary Background: MAAGs have, historically, been disparate organisations with a lack of central direction, albeit with the same goal: to develop and support the performance of audit in primary care. This goal has been (and is being) achieved in a number of ways all over the country. In the last two years, MAAGs have witnessed many changes in primary care and are adapting themselves to suit these new arrangements at a local level.

Aim: To formalise our knowledge of where MAAGs are going, how they are getting there and the support they are receiving.

Method: A postal questionnaire to the 104 MAAGs in England and Wales, addressing 6 main issues of relevance to the development of MAAGs and the support they are receiving.

Results: At least two MAAGs have dissolved, leaving a possible total of 102 still in existence. Of these, 76 (74.5%) responded to the survey. The composition of the MAAG committee has changed dramatically since the inception of MAAGs in 1990, and staffing levels appear to have risen substantially. MAAGs appear to be more adequately funded by their health authorities than has previously been reported and many are actively seeking additional sources of funding. There is still large variation in levels of MAAG funding. Furthermore, funding is unrelated to the number of GPs or practices served. Security for MAAG staff appears to have been addressed in many areas, with 84% of MAAGs having at least one member of staff on a permanent employment contract. Many MAAGs are developing rolling programmes in an attempt to eliminate the short-sighted approach to the development of clinical audit that has existed since MAAGs were first set up.

Conclusion:
Many MAAGs (with the obvious exception of those that have been dissolved) appear to be thriving without central direction or initiative. It is now evident that we were a little hasty in our concerns for the future of MAAGs beyond April 1996. It would seem that many organisations have taken the situation which arose two years ago as an opportunity to grow and develop in ways that may not have been possible within the confines of the Health Circular.
Language eng
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©1998, Eli Lilley National Clinical Audit Centre
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036437

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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