Pilot Study of clinician attitudes to insulin pump therapy: international differences and the need for a greater understanding of the patient perspective

Reaney, M.D., Barnard, K.D., Skinner, T.C. and Speight, J. 2007, Pilot Study of clinician attitudes to insulin pump therapy: international differences and the need for a greater understanding of the patient perspective, Value in health, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. A276-A276.

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Title Pilot Study of clinician attitudes to insulin pump therapy: international differences and the need for a greater understanding of the patient perspective
Author(s) Reaney, M.D.
Barnard, K.D.
Skinner, T.C.
Speight, J.
Journal name Value in health
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Start page A276
End page A276
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell
Place of publication Malden, Mass.
Publication date 2007-11
ISSN 1524-4733
1098-3015
Summary OBJECTIVES: To identify and survey health care professionals (HCPs) attitudes to insulin pump therapy (CSII).

METHODS: Eight specialists were interviewed to explore the attitudes and beliefs about CSII. Responses were analysed thematically and used to inform the design of a new 22-item questionnaire: the Attitudes to Pump Therapy (APT) Survey. The APT was pilottested among 95 HCPs (54% male; 75.5% diabetologists/DSNs, 13.8% general practitioners) at the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) conference, 2006. Results were analysed using non-parametric statistics with bonferroni correction.

RESULTS: Analyses of interview data identified 9 themes: biomedical, perceived control of care/diabetes, technology, quality of life, financial resources, training, education & support, suitability, and evidence-base. Items were designed to reflect these themes with responses scored on a 5-point Likert scale (strongly agree—strongly disagree). No statistically significant differences
were found by gender, HCP speciality, country (and continent) of origin or proportion of patients using CSII. Most notable differences were found in relation to gross domestic product (GDP) and the potential for pump therapy to achieve tight blood glucose control (lower GDP = more agreement: p = 0.001), and result in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (lower GDP = less agreement: p < 0.005). Ranked mean scores showed a split between biomedical/clinical items (N = 11) and items concerned with patient experience (N = 11). Attitudes about biomedical/clinical issues were generally clear (i.e. for 7/11 items, the mean score was “agree”) but less decisive about patient experience (i.e. for 8/11 items, the mean score was “neither agree nor disagree”).

CONCLUSION: Few subgroup differences existed, but those that did may be explained by lack of access to treatment (directly corresponding to GDP). Clinicians’ were generally clear in their attitudes regarding biomedical aspects but less so regarding patient experience. Research focusing on patient-reported outcomes is likely to offer clinicians a greater understanding of the patients’ perspective of insulin pump therapy.
Notes Contributed poster presentation, ISPOR Tenth Annual European Congress 20–23 October 2007, Dublin, Ireland
Language eng
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036442

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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