Why are some people with neurological illness more resilient than others?

McCabe, Marita P. and O'Connor, Elodie J. 2012, Why are some people with neurological illness more resilient than others?, Psychology, health & medicine, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 17-34.

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Title Why are some people with neurological illness more resilient than others?
Author(s) McCabe, Marita P.
O'Connor, Elodie J.
Journal name Psychology, health & medicine
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Start page 17
End page 34
Total pages 18
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1354-8506
Keyword(s) coping strategies
chronic neurological illness
resilience
adjustment
Summary The current qualitative study was designed to evaluate the coping strategies of people living with a chronic progressive neurological illness and their carers. The neurological illnesses were Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Participants included 15 people who showed high levels of adjustment and 15 who showed low levels of adjustment. Participants were selected from an earlier study, to ensure that they satisfied the inclusion criteria for the current study. Interviews were completed to determine the strategies used to cope with the demands of the illness. Participants who demonstrated good adjustment were more likely to draw on social support to provide them with the resources to deal with the illness. In contrast, those who evidenced poor adjustment were more likely to draw on external supports to complete tasks for them. The implications of these findings for people with chronic neurological illnesses and their families are discussed.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036739

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Tue, 30 Aug 2011, 12:10:38 EST by Jane Moschetti

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