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The establishment of large private nature reserves by conservation NGOs : key factors for successful implementation

Pasquini, Lorena, Fitzsimons, James A., Cowell, Stuart, Brandon, Katrina and Wescott, Geoff 2011, The establishment of large private nature reserves by conservation NGOs : key factors for successful implementation, Oryx, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 373-380.

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Title The establishment of large private nature reserves by conservation NGOs : key factors for successful implementation
Author(s) Pasquini, Lorena
Fitzsimons, James A.
Cowell, Stuart
Brandon, Katrina
Wescott, Geoff
Journal name Oryx
Volume number 45
Issue number 3
Start page 373
End page 380
Total pages 8
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2011-07-01
ISSN 0030-6053
Keyword(s) private protected areas
non-government organisations
land purchase
conservation covenants
management planning
reserve systems
Summary Private nature reserves created by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are increasing, and their growing number and extent means that they can potentially contribute to biodiversity goals at a global scale. However, the success of these reserves depends on the legal, economic and institutional conditions framing their creation and management. We explored these conditions, and the opportunities and challenges facing conservation organizations in managing private nature reserves, across several countries, with an emphasis on Australia. Results from 17 semi-structured interviews with representatives of private conservation organizations indicated that while private reserves may enhance the conservation estate, challenges remain. Legal frameworks, especially tenure and economic laws, vary across and within countries, presenting conservation organizations with significant opportunities or constraints to owning and/or managing private nature reserves. Many acquired land without strategic acquisition procedures and secured funding for property acquisition but not management, affecting the long-term maintenance of properties. Other typical problems were tied to the institutional capacity of the organizations. Greater planning within organizations, especially financial planning, is required and NGOs must understand opportunities and constraints present in legislative frameworks at the outset. Organizations must establish their expertise gaps and address them. To this end, partnerships between organizations and/or with government can prove critical.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.

An electronic version of this paper can obtained by emailing the author jfitzsimons@tnc.org First published online 7 June 2011.
Language eng
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050205 Environmental Management
Socio Economic Objective 961308 - Remnant Vegetation and Protected Conservation Areas at Regional or Larger Scales
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2011
Copyright notice ©2011, Fauna & Flora International
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036756

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Created: Tue, 30 Aug 2011, 21:04:05 EST by James Fitzsimons

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.