Understanding exercise uptake and adherence for people with chronic conditions : a new model demonstrating the importance of exercise identity, benefits of attending and support

Pentecost, C. and Taket, A. 2011, Understanding exercise uptake and adherence for people with chronic conditions : a new model demonstrating the importance of exercise identity, benefits of attending and support, Health education research, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 908-922.

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Title Understanding exercise uptake and adherence for people with chronic conditions : a new model demonstrating the importance of exercise identity, benefits of attending and support
Author(s) Pentecost, C.
Taket, A.
Journal name Health education research
Volume number 26
Issue number 5
Start page 908
End page 922
Total pages 15
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Cary, N.C.
Publication date 2011-10
ISSN 0268-1153
1465-3648
Summary Understanding the factors influencing uptake and adherence to exercise for people with chronic conditions from different ages, genders and ethnicities is important for planning exercise services. This paper presents evidence supporting a new model of exercise uptake and adherence applicable to people with chronic conditions from diverse socio-demographic backgrounds. The study is based on 130 semistructured interviews with people with chronic conditions, including both those who did and those who did not attend exercise services, and supporters of those who attended. Analysis followed the guidelines of ‘framework analysis’. Results show that three factors were particularly important in influencing adherence behavior: (i) exercise identity, (ii) support and (iii) perceived benefits of attending. Social and cultural identities impacted on willingness to exercise, importance of exercise and perceived appropriateness of exercising. Having at least one supporter providing different types of support was associated with high levels of attendance. Those people who valued the social and psychological benefits of attending were more likely to be high attenders. The new model illustrates interaction between these three factors and discusses how these can be taken into account when planning exercise services for people with chronic conditions drawn from diverse socio-demographic groups.
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2011
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30036806

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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