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Strength training of one limb increases corticomotor excitability projecting to the contralateral homologous limb

Kidgell, Dawson J., Stokes, Mark A. and Pearce, Alan J. 2011, Strength training of one limb increases corticomotor excitability projecting to the contralateral homologous limb, Motor control, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 247-266.

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Title Strength training of one limb increases corticomotor excitability projecting to the contralateral homologous limb
Author(s) Kidgell, Dawson J.
Stokes, Mark A.
Pearce, Alan J.
Journal name Motor control
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 247
End page 266
Total pages 21
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2011-04
ISSN 1087-1640
1543-2696
Keyword(s) strength training
contralateral transfer of strength
transcranial magnetic stimulation
corticomotor excitability
Summary The contralateral transfer of strength following unilateral strength training (ULS) is thought to be due to changes within the nervous system. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we compared corticospinal responses following ULS of the right biceps brachii (BB) projecting to the untrained left BB. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from both BB of 23 individuals pre and post 4 weeks heavy load (80% of 1RM) ULS of right BB. TMS was delivered at intensities below active motor threshold (AMT) to saturation of the MEP (MEPmax). ULS resulted in a 28% increase in 1RM right BB strength, resulting in a 19.2% increase in contralateral strength of the left BB (p = .0001). There was a significant increase in MEP amplitude of 30.3% (p = .03), 33% (p = .05), and 26.5% (p = .01) at AMT, 20% above AMT and MEPmax respectively. No significant differences in silent period were seen at AMT, 20% above AMT or MEPmax. This study has demonstrated increased corticospinal excitability projecting to the untrained arm following heavy load ULS.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 170205 Neurocognitive Patterns and Neural Networks
Socio Economic Objective 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Human Kinetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30037027

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.