The activities and impacts of part-time employment on full time undergraduate students in property and construction courses in Australia

Ashford, Peter and Mills, Anthony 2004, The activities and impacts of part-time employment on full time undergraduate students in property and construction courses in Australia, in Creating flexible learning environments : proceedings of the 15th Australasian Conference for the Australasian Association for Engineering Education and the 10th Australasian Women in Engineering Forum, Australasian Association for Engineering Education, Toowoomba, Qld., pp. 275-283.

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Title The activities and impacts of part-time employment on full time undergraduate students in property and construction courses in Australia
Author(s) Ashford, Peter
Mills, Anthony
Conference name Australasian Conference for the Engineering Education (15th : 2004 : Toowoomba, Qld.)
Conference location Toowoomba, Qld.
Conference dates 27-29 Sept. 2004
Title of proceedings Creating flexible learning environments : proceedings of the 15th Australasian Conference for the Australasian Association for Engineering Education and the 10th Australasian Women in Engineering Forum
Editor(s) Snook, Chris
Thorpe, David
Publication date 2004
Conference series Australasian Conference for the Engineering Education
Start page 275
End page 283
Total pages 9
Publisher Australasian Association for Engineering Education
Place of publication Toowoomba, Qld.
Keyword(s) combining work and study
valuable work experience
negotiated engagement
Summary This paper examines the extent of part-time employment of undergraduate students enrolled in property and construction related courses in five universities across Australia. Forty five percent of the students responded to a questionnaire on their part-time work. Past research reveals that there is need for a more accurate understanding as to why students seek part-time work to the extent that they do and that working long hours has a negative effect on the study patterns of undergraduate students. Increased employer work demands results in less time available for study and an inability to attend lectures because of work. There is growing concern that students are increasingly disinterested in connecting with the broader and total university experience and are instead, seeking to adopt a minimalist approach to education.

Analysis of current research for Property and construction students’ results reveals that students are working on average 18 hours per week during semester time. The students therefore appear to be working beyond what is considered beneficial to their studies, although their contextual understanding and work ethic improves.

The paper concludes with some approaches that could re- engage students into the learning process. It may be helpful to develop a partnership between the University and the industry thereby providing work experience that complements the program of study. Otherwise students may not get the range of experience they need and may struggle to find the linkages between theory and practice.
ISBN 0975683101
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Australasian Association for Engineering Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30037043

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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