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Where will we live when we get older?

McLaughlin, Tricia and Mills, Anthony 2008, Where will we live when we get older?, Quality in ageing, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 15-21.

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Title Where will we live when we get older?
Author(s) McLaughlin, Tricia
Mills, Anthony
Journal name Quality in ageing
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Start page 15
End page 21
Total pages 7
Publisher Pier Professional
Place of publication Hove, England
Publication date 2008-09-01
ISSN 1471-7794
Keyword(s) housing older people
aged-care accommodation
ageing population
retirement housing design
Summary Ageing populations, although exhibiting marked differences across countries and cultures, are a global phenomenon. Old-age dependency ratios in most developed countries are projected to double by the year 2050. In Australia there will be a strain on economic growth as a large part of the population moves from pre-retirement to post-retirement age over the next 25 years. A disproportionate amount of this strain will be concentrated in aged-care housing or retirement accommodation. Current evidence suggests that existing housing stock for older people is inadequate. As the Australian population ages, the maintenance and long-term performance of retirement housing is a key concern of government and housing providers. This study looked at four aged-care or retirement providers across Australia and examined the performance of the current housing stock managed by these providers. The interviews revealed that housing design decisions in retirement stock, although critically important to the changing needs of occupants and the adequate supply of suitable housing, are often ill-considered. The findings critically question the idea of simply building ‘more of the same’ to relieve demand. This study has major implications for the future of Australian retirement housing, especially as the population ages dramatically.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 169999 Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Pavilion Journals (Brighton) Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30037089

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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