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Cultural politics in the English classroom : textually dangerous territory?

Charles, Claire 2005, Cultural politics in the English classroom : textually dangerous territory?, Idiom : journal of the Victorian association for the teaching of english, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 24-31.

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Title Cultural politics in the English classroom : textually dangerous territory?
Author(s) Charles, Claire
Journal name Idiom : journal of the Victorian association for the teaching of english
Volume number 41
Issue number 3
Start page 24
End page 31
Publisher Victorian Association for the Teaching of English
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0046-8568
Keyword(s) English curriculum
English teaching
femininity
gender stereotypes
masculinity
popular culture
sexuality
sociocultural patterns
sociocultural factors
secondary education
Summary How might one approach cultural politics in the English classroom? What might the role of the class text be in these discussions? This article is a snapshot of the author's journey from a pre-service English teacher to her most recent experiences of English teaching. Her pre- service pedagogy indicated a 'minimization' of the role of the text in unpacking cultural politics; the text itself was overshadowed by the important points the teacher was making about critiquing the way the world is socially, culturally and politically organised. In her beginning teaching year, the author was in a remote rural school where she encountered attitudes to hegemonic masculinity and heterosexuality which she felt she did not deal appropriately with. She now believes that more emphasis on how the features of the text itself work to create meaning and construct identities is needed. She recognises the importance of close textual analysis as a way toward engaging in culturally political conversations about constructions of gender and sexuality in media and non-media texts. If she were to have her beginning teaching years over again, she would probably collate a series of contrasting representations of masculinity and femininity from a variety of sources, including popular culture. She would then develop activities based around undertaking textual analysis of the constructions of gender and sexuality, and ask students to identify the different elements in the texts that create meaning, and compare similarities and differences between texts.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Victorian Association for the Teaching of English
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30037177

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.