Openly accessible

Chromatic interaction between egg pigmentation and skin chromatophores in the nuptial coloration of female two-spotted gobies

Svensson, Per Andreas, Forsgren, Elisabet, Amundsen, Trond and Sköld, Helen Nilsson 2005, Chromatic interaction between egg pigmentation and skin chromatophores in the nuptial coloration of female two-spotted gobies, Journal of experimental biology, vol. 208, no. 23, pp. 4391-4397.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
svensson-chromaticinteraction-2005.pdf Published version application/pdf 318.03KB 32

Title Chromatic interaction between egg pigmentation and skin chromatophores in the nuptial coloration of female two-spotted gobies
Author(s) Svensson, Per Andreas
Forsgren, Elisabet
Amundsen, Trond
Sköld, Helen Nilsson
Journal name Journal of experimental biology
Volume number 208
Issue number 23
Start page 4391
End page 4397
Publisher The Company of Biologists Ltd.
Place of publication Cambridge, U.K.
Publication date 2005-12-01
ISSN 0022-0949
1477-9145
Keyword(s) sexual selection
nuptial signal
female ornament
courtship
Gobiusculus flavescens
Summary In two-spotted gobies (Gobiusculus flavescens Fabricius 1779), females develop an orange belly as they approach sexual maturity. Bright belly coloration is preferred by males and has been suggested to act as a female ornament. This coloration is unusual in that it originates partly from pigmentation of the abdominal skin but also from strongly pigmented gonads directly visible through the skin. In addition, females have been observed to temporarily become more colourful during courtship and competition. To understand how gonad and skin pigmentation interact in this nuptial coloration, the potential for colour modification via regulation of skin chromatophores was investigated. Noradrenaline caused aggregation of chromatophore pigment and was used to experimentally reduce the contribution of skin chromatophores to the nuptial coloration. Chromatophore pigment aggregation caused bellies to become less colourful and abdominal skin biopsies to become less colourful and more transparent. There was a strong positive relationship between belly coloration and the coloration of the underlying gonads. This shows that belly coloration honestly reflects egg pigmentation, mainly because the transparency of the abdominal skin allows other fish to see the gonads directly. Interestingly, when noradrenaline caused pigment to aggregate and thereby increased the transparency of the skin, the relationship between belly and gonad coloration weakened. We conclude that female G. flavescens have a potential to use skin chromatophores to rapidly alter their nuptial coloration, thereby affecting the efficacy with which information about gonad coloration is conveyed.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005 , The Company of Biologists Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30038901

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 42 Abstract Views, 32 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 20 Oct 2011, 14:00:52 EST by Joshua Walker

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.