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Effects of humidity on the response of the bark beetle Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to synthetic aggregation pheromone

Bassett, Michelle A., Baumgartner, John B., Hallett, Monique L., Hassan, Yasmin and Symonds, Matthew R. E. 2011, Effects of humidity on the response of the bark beetle Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to synthetic aggregation pheromone, Australian journal of entomology, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 48-51, doi: 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2010.00780.x.

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Title Effects of humidity on the response of the bark beetle Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to synthetic aggregation pheromone
Author(s) Bassett, Michelle A.
Baumgartner, John B.
Hallett, Monique L.
Hassan, Yasmin
Symonds, Matthew R. E.ORCID iD for Symonds, Matthew R. E. orcid.org/0000-0002-9785-6045
Journal name Australian journal of entomology
Volume number 50
Issue number 1
Start page 48
End page 51
Total pages 4
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Richmond, Vic.
Publication date 2011-02
ISSN 1326-6756
1440-6055
Keyword(s) aggregation pheromone
Coleoptera
environment
humidity
semiochemical
Summary Environmental factors may affect chemical communication between individuals by limiting their ability to detect and respond to these signals. One such factor, high humidity, has been shown to interfere with the normal response of some invertebrate species to their attractant pheromones. The effect of humidity on the response of the five-spined bark beetle, Ips grandicollis, to a synthetic form of the aggregation pheromone component ipsenol, was tested in an experimental chamber in the laboratory. The response was measured as both the number of beetles to reach the pheromone source and the time taken, and was tested under high (>80% relative humidity) and low (30–40% relative humidity) conditions of humidity. There was no significant difference in response of beetles between the two treatments although there was a reduction in response in the high-humidity treatment when relative humidity levels were in excess of 90%. These findings suggest that atmospheric humidity does not influence bark beetles response to synthetic pheromone, except perhaps in unlikely conditions of excessive humidity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2010.00780.x
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060801 Animal Behaviour
060808 Invertebrate Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Wiley - Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039049

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