You are not logged in.

Distributional overlap rather than habitat differentiation characterizes co-occurrence of bivalves in intertidal soft sediment systems

Compton, Tanya J., Troost, Tineke A., van der Meer, Jaap, Kraan, Casper, Honkoop, Pieter J. C., Rogers, Danny I., Pearson, Grant B., de Goeij, Petra, Lavaleye, Marc S. S., Leyrer, Jutta, Yates, Mick G., Dekinga, Anne and Piersma, Theunis 2008, Distributional overlap rather than habitat differentiation characterizes co-occurrence of bivalves in intertidal soft sediment systems, Marine ecology progress series, vol. 373, pp. 25-35, doi: 10.3354/meps07732.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Distributional overlap rather than habitat differentiation characterizes co-occurrence of bivalves in intertidal soft sediment systems
Author(s) Compton, Tanya J.
Troost, Tineke A.
van der Meer, Jaap
Kraan, Casper
Honkoop, Pieter J. C.
Rogers, Danny I.
Pearson, Grant B.
de Goeij, Petra
Lavaleye, Marc S. S.
Leyrer, Jutta
Yates, Mick G.
Dekinga, Anne
Piersma, Theunis
Journal name Marine ecology progress series
Volume number 373
Start page 25
End page 35
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2008
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Summary Diverse species assemblages are often associated with a diversity of habitat structures. Sedimentary systems seem to be no exception, as within sedimentary systems benthic species diversity within a sample point appears to correlate with sediment grain size complexity. However, it remains to be shown whether total benthic species diversity relates to a system’s sediment heterogeneity across multiple systems. In the present paper we examined whether bivalve diversity is associated with: (1) sediment heterogeneity across systems and (2) sediment grain size complexity within systems, at 9 temperate and tropical tidal flat systems. Although bivalve life-history strategies, like post-settlement habitat selection, might suggest that sediment heterogeneity should be important for bivalve species, bivalve diversity and sediment heterogeneity were not associated across systems. Interestingly, the association between total benthic diversity and sediment heterogeneity was also not significant, suggesting that changing species composition across systems does not account for the lack of a correlation between bivalve diversity and sediment heterogeneity. Instead of habitat differentiation, bivalve diversity within a sample point was highest in ‘complex’ fine-grained sediments and bivalve distributions showed a large degree of distributional overlap in all systems. The results of this study at both smaller and larger spatial scales suggest that coexistence between bivalve species in diverse tidal flats is not associated with increased sediment heterogeneity.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/meps07732
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Inter-Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039232

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 87 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 24 Oct 2011, 11:48:16 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.