What has transcranial magnetic stimulation taught us about neural adaptations to strength training? A brief review

Kidgell, Dawson J. and Pearce, Alan J. 2011, What has transcranial magnetic stimulation taught us about neural adaptations to strength training? A brief review, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 25, no. 11, pp. 3208-3217.

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Title What has transcranial magnetic stimulation taught us about neural adaptations to strength training? A brief review
Author(s) Kidgell, Dawson J.
Pearce, Alan J.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 25
Issue number 11
Start page 3208
End page 3217
Total pages 10
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2011-11
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Keyword(s) silent period
surface electromyography
motorevoked potential
corticospinal excitability
Summary The evidence for neural mechanisms underpinning rapid strength increases has been investigated and discussed for over 30 years using indirect methods, such as surface electromyography, with inferences made toward the nervous system. Alternatively, electrical stimulation techniques such as the Hoffman reflex, volitional wave, and maximal wave have provided evidence of central nervous system changes at the spinal level. For 25 years, the technique of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has allowed for noninvasive supraspinal measurement of the human nervous system in a number of areas such as fatigue, skill acquisition, clinical neurophysiology, and neurology. However, it has only been within the last decade that this technique has been used to assess neural changes after strength training. The aim of this brief review is to provide an overview of TMS, discuss specific strength training studies that have investigated changes, after short-term strength training in healthy populations in upper and lower limbs, and conclude with further research suggestions and the application of this knowledge for the strength and conditioning coach.
Language eng
Field of Research 110603 Motor Control
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, National Strength and Conditioning Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039405

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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Created: Wed, 26 Oct 2011, 08:32:09 EST by Jane Moschetti

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