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Wood to water : short-term effects of the re-introduction of wood to streams in agricultural environments

Lester, R., Jones-Lennon, M. and Wright, W. 2005, Wood to water : short-term effects of the re-introduction of wood to streams in agricultural environments, in The World Conference on Ecological Restoration Conference Abstract, [Society for Ecological Restoration International], [Tucson, Ariz.].

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Title Wood to water : short-term effects of the re-introduction of wood to streams in agricultural environments
Author(s) Lester, R.
Jones-Lennon, M.
Wright, W.
Conference name World Conference on Ecological Restoration (2005 : Zaragoza, Spain)
Conference location Zaragoza, Spain
Conference dates 14-16 Sep. 2005
Title of proceedings The World Conference on Ecological Restoration Conference Abstract
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2005
Conference series World Conference on Ecological Restoration
Publisher [Society for Ecological Restoration International]
Place of publication [Tucson, Ariz.]
Keyword(s) macroinvertebrate
wood
rehabilitation
Summary Rehabilitation of streams on agricultural properties has become a priority for landholders and managers in recent years in Australia. Fencing and re-vegetation of riparian zones are first priorities to improve riparian habitat values and biodiversity, however changes to in-stream habitat complexity are unlikely to result in the short term. Little evidence exists to guide subsequent rehabilitation actions to address this issue. Artificially re-introducing wood to such streams may be a useful strategy to increase habitat complexity more rapidly, thereby improving in-stream biodiversity values. To test this hypothesis, as a part of the larger Productive Grazing, Healthy Rivers project, small pieces of wood were introduced to eight sites on beef and dairy properties across southern Victoria, monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates, water quality, hydrology and habitat quality. Comparing macroinvertebrate communities before and after treatment, and between experimental and control sites, changes in community composition and colonisation are explored.
Language eng
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039426

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment
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