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Water quality modelling for drinking water distribution systems

Jegatheesan, V., Kastl, G., Fisher, I., Chandy, J. and Angles, M. 2003, Water quality modelling for drinking water distribution systems, in MODSIM 2003 : International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, Jupiters Hotel and Casino, 14-17 July 2003 : integrative modelling of biophysical, social and economic systems for resource management solutions : proceedings, Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand, Canberra, A. C. T..

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Title Water quality modelling for drinking water distribution systems
Author(s) Jegatheesan, V.
Kastl, G.
Fisher, I.
Chandy, J.
Angles, M.
Conference name International Congress on Modelling and Simulation (2003 : Jupiters Hotel, Townsville, Queensland)
Conference location Townsville, Qld.
Conference dates 14-17 Jul. 2003
Title of proceedings MODSIM 2003 : International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, Jupiters Hotel and Casino, 14-17 July 2003 : integrative modelling of biophysical, social and economic systems for resource management solutions : proceedings
Editor(s) Post, David A.
Publication date 2003
Conference series International Congress on Modelling and Simulation
Total pages 6
Publisher Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Canberra, A. C. T.
Keyword(s) biofilm
bulk water
drinking water quality
modelling
Summary A dynamic water quality model for drinking water distribution systems has been developed in this study, to include processes that occur in the bulk water, as well as those occurring in the biofilm of a distribution system. The model has been validated against water quality data obtained from extensive experimental studies conducted with biofilm reactors. Protein and carbohydrate densities in the biofilm represent biofilm biomass. This model is able to predict the disinfectant decay due to organic matter in the bulk water, as well as that due to biofilm. It simultaneously predicts the growth of biofilm in terms of carbohydrate and protein densities. While this model is complex enough to describe the water quality changes in a distribution system, it is also simple enough to be incorporated into a hydraulic model in order to describe the interaction between disinfectant and microbiological quality throughout a drinking water distribution system.
ISBN 9781740520980
174052098X
Language eng
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039635

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Engineering
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