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Comparative study on performance of yeast and bacterial membrane bioreactors for high salinity wastewater treatment

Dan, N. P., Visvanathan, C., Ben Aim, R. and Jegatheesan, V. 2006, Comparative study on performance of yeast and bacterial membrane bioreactors for high salinity wastewater treatment, International journal of environmental technology and management, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 612-630.

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Title Comparative study on performance of yeast and bacterial membrane bioreactors for high salinity wastewater treatment
Author(s) Dan, N. P.
Visvanathan, C.
Ben Aim, R.
Jegatheesan, V.
Journal name International journal of environmental technology and management
Volume number 6
Issue number 6
Start page 612
End page 630
Publisher Inderscience Publishers
Place of publication Geneva, Switzerland
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1466-2132
1741-511X
Keyword(s) extra-cellular polymers
high salinity
hollow fibre membrane
membrane fouling
bioreactor performance
yeast bioreactors
bacterial membrane bioreactors
wastewater treatment
high saline wastewater
environmental technology
yeast sludge
Summary Two laboratory-scale membrane bioreactor systems were investigated to treat high saline wastewater containing 1,000 mg/L COD and 32 g/L NaCl, namely: the yeast membrane bioreactor (YMBR) and the bacterial membrane bioreactor (BMBR). COD removal of both processes was above 90% at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 hours (volumetric loading of 5 kg COD/m³.d), sludge retention time (SRT) of 50 days (the MLSS of above 14 g/L and the F/M of 0.4 d-1). Under these operating conditions, the YMBR could run at a ten-fold lower transmembrane pressure with significantly reduced membrane fouling rate compared to BMBR. This may be because of low production of adhesive extracellular polymers (ECP) and the secondary filtration layer formed from large yeast cells. ECP production of bacterial sludge was increased considerably at high salt concentrations (32 g/L and 45 g/L) and long SRTs. For the bacterial sludge, the increased salinity led to increase in ECP, whereas the ECP content of the yeast sludge was relatively small.
Language eng
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039713

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Engineering
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