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Identification and possible disease mechanisms of an under-recognized fungus, Aureobasidium pullulans

Taylor, Philip E., Esch, Robert, Flagan, Richard C., House, James, Tran, Lisa and Glovsky, M. Michael 2006, Identification and possible disease mechanisms of an under-recognized fungus, Aureobasidium pullulans, International archives of allergy and immunology, vol. 139, no. 1, pp. 45-52.

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Title Identification and possible disease mechanisms of an under-recognized fungus, Aureobasidium pullulans
Formatted title Identification and possible disease mechanisms of an under-recognized fungus, Aureobasidium pullulans
Author(s) Taylor, Philip E.ORCID iD for Taylor, Philip E. orcid.org/0000-0002-4204-1893
Esch, Robert
Flagan, Richard C.
House, James
Tran, Lisa
Glovsky, M. Michael
Journal name International archives of allergy and immunology
Volume number 139
Issue number 1
Start page 45
End page 52
Publisher S. Karger AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1018-2438
1423-0097
Keyword(s) aureobasidium pullulans
yeast-like fungi
respirable-sized conidia
Summary Background: Investigations into the occurrence and health effects of yeast-like fungi in the outdoor air in the US have been limited. We sought to identify a respirable-sized fungus common in the Pasadena air, locate a major source for the emissions and investigate its relevance to allergic disease. Methods: Yeast-like fungi sampled from the environment were isolated, microscopically examined and sequenced. Pasadena allergy patients were skin tested with commercially available fungal extracts. Patient serum was immunoanalyzed for specific IgE reactivity. Nearby vegetation was analyzed in a controlled emission chamber to find a major source for the aerosols. Results: Hyaline unicellular conidia comprised up to 90% (41,250 m<sup>-3</sup> of air) of total fungal counts and generally peaked at night and during periods of rainfall and ensuing winds throughout the fall and winter. Flowers were determined to be a major source of the emissions. The cellular and colonial morphology of isolates were consistent with Aureobasidium species. The sequence of the D1/D2 region of the 26S ribosomal subunit of isolates from flowers showed identity to two strains of Aureohasidium pullulans (black yeast). Seventeen percent (16/94) of atopic individuals had positive skin testing with A. pullulans extract. Patient sera gE identified several high molecular weight allergens in Aureobasidium extracts. Conclusions: Respirable-sized conidia of A. pullulans are emitted from flowers and form high concentrations in the air. They are associated with immediate reactivity on skin tests, bind to patient sera IgE, and might be relevant in allergic upper and lower airway diseases.
Language eng
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006 S. Karger AG, Basel
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039857

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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