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The brain in the jar : troubling the truths of discourses of adolescent brain development

Kelly, Peter 2010, The brain in the jar : troubling the truths of discourses of adolescent brain development, in TASA 2010 : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association 2010, TASA, [Sydney, N.S.W.], pp. 1-11.

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Title The brain in the jar : troubling the truths of discourses of adolescent brain development
Author(s) Kelly, Peter
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2010 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W
Conference dates 6 - 9 Dec. 2010
Title of proceedings TASA 2010 : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association 2010
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher TASA
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Summary Ideas about adolescent brains and their development increasingly function as powerful truths in making sense of young people. And it is the knowledge practices of the neurosciences and evolutionary and developmental psychology that are deemed capable of producing what we have come to understand as the evidence on which policy, interventions and education should be built. In effect these discourses reduce young people to little more than a brain in a jar. The paper examines how the evidence about adolescent brains - their volume, and the functioning and activity of different regions - from neuroscience and evolutionary and developmental psychology works as truth. What knowledge practices are used to produce this evidence, or are deemed capable of producing this evidence? What truth claims are able to attach to this evidence? What makes it true and why is it imagined as evidence of something that is true in policy, public and other research settings that are often far removed from where it was produced? I argue that the discourses of adolescent brain development disembody, reduce and simplify the complexities of these figures we know as adolescents. In effect they render the adolescent as a brain in a jar.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, TASA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039918

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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Created: Fri, 04 Nov 2011, 08:22:21 EST by Kylie Koulkoudinas

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.