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Food, passion and marginalised young people : technologies of the self in Jamie's kitchen

Kelly, Peter 2009, Food, passion and marginalised young people : technologies of the self in Jamie's kitchen, in TASA 2009 : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association 2009 : The future of sociology, TASA, Canberra, A. C. T., pp. 1-12.

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Title Food, passion and marginalised young people : technologies of the self in Jamie's kitchen
Author(s) Kelly, Peter
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2009 : Canberra, A.C.T)
Conference location Canberra, A.C.T
Conference dates 1 - 4 Dec. 2009
Title of proceedings TASA 2009 : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association 2009 : The future of sociology
Editor(s) Lockie, Stewart
Bissell, David
Greig, Alistair
Hynes, Maria
Marsh, David
Saha, Larry
Sikora, Joanna
Woodman, Dan
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher TASA
Place of publication Canberra, A. C. T.
Keyword(s) Jamie’s Kitchen
Marginalised Young People
Foucault
Food
Passion
Technologies of the Self
Summary A passion for food that is understood in certain ways – slow, organic, not industrialised – plays a central role in the drama of the successful and popular Jamie’s Kitchen (2002) and Jamie’s Kitchen Australia (2006). Large parts of the drama in these shows revolve around an apparent lack of passion that is displayed by the marginalised, unemployed young people that are the central characters in this story. In this paper I examine the ways in which these accounts of food, passion, and the training of marginalised young people expose some of the challenges and opportunities faced by marginalised young people as they seek to transition into the uncertain and risky labour markets of 21st century capitalism. I argue that Michel Foucault’s (1988) concept of technologies of the self enables us to understand passion, and its particular manifestations in Jamie’s Kitchen, and in the training of marginalised young people, as a powerful technology of self transformation. The drama of Jamie’s Kitchen suggests that as a technology of the self passion for food promises to provide precarious, possibly temporary, forms of salvation, meaning and purpose for the young people engaged in the Fifteen Foundation’s social enterprise transitional labour market program.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780646525013
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039919

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.