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Didaked : celebrity, privacy and player behaviour in the AFL

Kelly, Peter and Hickey, Christopher 2007, Didaked : celebrity, privacy and player behaviour in the AFL, in TASA & SAANZ Joint Conference 2007 : Public Sociologies : Lessons and Trans-Tasman comparisons, Dept. of Sociology, University of Auckland, [Auckland, N.Z.], pp. 1-6.

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Title Didaked : celebrity, privacy and player behaviour in the AFL
Author(s) Kelly, Peter
Hickey, Christopher
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2007 : University of Auckland)
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 4 - 7 Dec, 2007
Title of proceedings TASA & SAANZ Joint Conference 2007 : Public Sociologies : Lessons and Trans-Tasman comparisons
Editor(s) Curtis, B.
Matthewman, S.
McIntosh, T.
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Dept. of Sociology, University of Auckland
Place of publication [Auckland, N.Z.]
Summary At the start of the 21st century elite male team sports assume a high profile presence in the commodified spaces of a globalised hyperreality. When games are sports entertainment businesses many elite performers are celebrities: they exist as brands whose every thought and action is commodified and consumed.
In these spaces the misbehaviours of a relatively small number of Australian Rules Football (AFL) players continue to make the news. A high profile recent incident involving Collingwood footballer Alan Didak is the subject of this paper. Given the levels of media attention devoted to such events we ask: Do AFL footballers have a right to privacy? We also question whether AFL players really understand what it means to be a sports celebrity.
The elevation of the sport star to the status of celebrity means that the idea that an elite performer has a private life and a public life that are separate is one that is problematic. Drawing on Foucault’s later work on the care of the self, our analysis will focus on a variety of processes which seek to develop and manage a professional identity for elite performers – and the risks that attach to these identities.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2007
Copyright notice ©2005, TASA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30039921

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
Alfred Deakin Research Institute
Open Access Collection
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Created: Fri, 04 Nov 2011, 08:54:32 EST by Kylie Koulkoudinas

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.