Predicting future anabolic-androgenic steroid use intentions with current substance use : findings from an internet-based survey.

Dunn, Matthew, Mazanov, Jason and Sitharthan, Gomathi 2009, Predicting future anabolic-androgenic steroid use intentions with current substance use : findings from an internet-based survey., Clinical journal of sports medicine, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 222-227, doi: 10.1097/JSM.0b013e31819d65ad.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Predicting future anabolic-androgenic steroid use intentions with current substance use : findings from an internet-based survey.
Author(s) Dunn, MatthewORCID iD for Dunn, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-4615-5078
Mazanov, Jason
Sitharthan, Gomathi
Journal name Clinical journal of sports medicine
Volume number 19
Issue number 3
Start page 222
End page 227
Total pages 6
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1050-642X
1536-3724
Summary OBJECTIVE: To explore how current substance use, including the use of sports supplements and illicit drugs, may impact upon a person's future intentions to use anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS).

DESIGN: Web-based survey.

PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred fourteen exercising males (mean age, 30 years; range, 17-61 years) recruited from 5 gymnasia in Sydney, Australia, completed a web-based survey. The survey contained questions relating to sport supplement use, illicit substance use, reasons for currently not using AAS, and reasons for intending to use AAS in the future.

INTERVENTIONS: Participants completed a structured interview schedule that included questions regarding licit and illicit substance use, reasons for non-AAS use, and, where appropriate, reasons for intended future AAS use.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The planned main outcome measure was positive intention to use AAS.

RESULTS:
Sixteen percent of the sample indicated that they would use AAS in the future. Reasons for future AAS use included increasing muscle size (80%), improving appearance (74%), and increasing strength (57%). Four-fifths (80%) of the sample reported use of sports supplements, with vitamins and protein supplements commonly reported (83% and 67%, respectively); more than one-third (36%) reported use of creatine in the past 6 months. Half (52%) of the sample reported use of illicit substances in the preceding 6 months, with amphetamines and cannabis commonly reported (66% and 62%, respectively). Significant predictors of intending to use AAS included past 6-month use of creatine and knowing AAS users.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of sport supplements and/or illicit substances may remove barriers for the future use of such drugs as AAS. Future research is necessary to explore in depth whether such substances may act as a "gateway" to future AAS use.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/JSM.0b013e31819d65ad
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040085

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 26 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 439 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 09 Nov 2011, 11:18:39 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.