The delivery of a telephone coaching programme to people with type 2 diabetes by practice nurses in Victoria, Australia : a qualitative evaluation

Walker, Christine, Furler, John, Blackberry, Irene, Dunbar, James, Young, Doris and Best, James 2011, The delivery of a telephone coaching programme to people with type 2 diabetes by practice nurses in Victoria, Australia : a qualitative evaluation, Journal of nursing and healthcare of chronic illness, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 419-426.

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Title The delivery of a telephone coaching programme to people with type 2 diabetes by practice nurses in Victoria, Australia : a qualitative evaluation
Author(s) Walker, Christine
Furler, John
Blackberry, Irene
Dunbar, James
Young, Doris
Best, James
Journal name Journal of nursing and healthcare of chronic illness
Volume number 3
Issue number 4
Start page 419
End page 426
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Hoboken N.J.
Publication date 2011-12
ISSN 1752-9816
1752-9824
Keyword(s) diabetes
nursing practice
primary care
qualitative study
self-management
Summary Aim.  To evaluate telephone coaching undertaken by practice nurses in a randomised controlled trial of self-management support for people with type 2 diabetes.

Background.  Qualitative evaluation of the processes that take place in randomised controlled trials has the advantage of providing information on those variables that contribute to the success or failure of the randomised controlled trial. This additional information can be used to improve or modify chronic disease management programme designs.

Methods.  Grounded theory was used to analyse transcriptions of telephone coaching sessions between practice nurses and patient participants in the randomised controlled trial.

Findings.   Analysis of transcriptions found that patient participants had complex multiple medical conditions to manage, as well as maintaining their daily lives. Two approaches to working with this complexity by practice nurses emerged. We characterised one as ‘treat to target’ and the other as ‘personalised care’. While each approach shapes identities available to patients within the relationship with the practice nurse, the impact or effectiveness of these approaches on outcomes has yet to be reported.

Conclusions.  Telephone coaching takes place in complex social contexts as well as complex medical conditions. People with type 2 diabetes must manage their diabetes care and their care of other conditions within their social contexts. This means a constant negotiation of priorities.

Relevance to clinical practice.  Awareness of how health professional support for patients’ self-management becomes a relationship and element of the negotiated identity of patients is important in adapting clinical guideline-based protocols to achieving targets in the management of chronic illness.
Language eng
Field of Research 111717 Primary Health Care
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040224

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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