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Ecological niche modelling and DNA sequencing support a new, morphologically cryptic beetle species unveiled by DNA barcoding

Hawlitschek, Oliver, Porch, Nick, Hendrich, Lars and Balke, Michael 2011, Ecological niche modelling and DNA sequencing support a new, morphologically cryptic beetle species unveiled by DNA barcoding, PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 1-14.

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Title Ecological niche modelling and DNA sequencing support a new, morphologically cryptic beetle species unveiled by DNA barcoding
Author(s) Hawlitschek, Oliver
Porch, Nick
Hendrich, Lars
Balke, Michael
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 6
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 14
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Ca.
Publication date 2011-02-09
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Background: DNA sequencing techniques used to estimate biodiversity, such as DNA barcoding, may reveal cryptic species. However, disagreements between barcoding and morphological data have already led to controversy. Species delimitation should therefore not be based on mtDNA alone. Here, we explore the use of nDNA and bioclimatic modelling in a new species of aquatic beetle revealed by mtDNA sequence data.

Methodology/Principal Findings: The aquatic beetle fauna of Australia is characterised by high degrees of endemism, including local radiations such as the genus Antiporus. Antiporus femoralis was previously considered to exist in two disjunct, but morphologically indistinguishable populations in south-western and south-eastern Australia. We constructed a phylogeny of Antiporus and detected a deep split between these populations. Diagnostic characters from the highly variable nuclear protein encoding arginine kinase gene confirmed the presence of two isolated populations. We then used ecological niche modelling to examine the climatic niche characteristics of the two populations. All results support the status of the two populations as distinct species. We describe the south-western species as Antiporus occidentalis sp.n.

Conclusion/Significance: In addition to nDNA sequence data and extended use of mitochondrial sequences, ecological niche modelling has great potential for delineating morphologically cryptic species. © 2011 Hawlitschek et al.
Notes This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Language eng
Field of Research 060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography
Socio Economic Objective 960807 Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Hawlitschek et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040447

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.