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Drought-rainfall cycles as potential environmental drivers of fowl plague and Newcastle disease uutbreaks in Australian poultry

Klaassen, Marcel, Hoye, Bethany and Roshier, David 2011, Drought-rainfall cycles as potential environmental drivers of fowl plague and Newcastle disease uutbreaks in Australian poultry, Ecohealth, vol. 7, no. supplement 1, pp. S75-S76, doi: 10.1007/s10393-010-0376-0.

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Title Drought-rainfall cycles as potential environmental drivers of fowl plague and Newcastle disease uutbreaks in Australian poultry
Author(s) Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Hoye, BethanyORCID iD for Hoye, Bethany orcid.org/0000-0001-9502-5582
Roshier, David
Journal name Ecohealth
Volume number 7
Issue number supplement 1
Start page S75
End page S76
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1612-9202
1612-9210
Summary Climatic conditions in Australia are erratic and characterised by periods of intense rainfall followed by periods of intense drought. This has considerable impact on the population dynamics and ecology of many Australian species of waterfowl, which are thought to form the reservoir of avian influenza viruses (AIV) but may also be important carriers (and possibly reservoirs) of other diseases (e.g. bursal disease, Newcastle disease). During the wet, waterfowl numbers increase with many serologically naive juveniles entering the population. During the subsequent period of drought, bird densities increase in the few remaining wetlands. We hypothesise that it is during this period of increasing densities of naive birds that the population’s viral prevalence of some infectious diseases may increase dramatically. Indeed, there exists a remarkable and suggestive coincidence between outbreaks of fowl plaque and Newcastle disease in Australian poultry farms and the periods of drought following a very wet period. In other words, we suspect a link between increased risk for disease outbreaks in poultry farms and the hypothesised high in the prevalences of the viruses causing these diseases in waterfowl. Given that poultry farms may provide ideal conditions for development of high-pathogenic strains, there is also a reciprocal risk for wildlife involved during these periods.
Notes Presented at the 1st International One Health Congress
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10393-010-0376-0
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040549

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