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A new method to warm up lubricating oil to improve the fuel efficiency during cold start

Will, Frank and Boretti, Alberto 2011, A new method to warm up lubricating oil to improve the fuel efficiency during cold start, SAE international journal of engines, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 175-187, doi: 10.4271/2011-01-0318.

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Title A new method to warm up lubricating oil to improve the fuel efficiency during cold start
Author(s) Will, Frank
Boretti, Alberto
Journal name SAE international journal of engines
Volume number 4
Issue number 1
Start page 175
End page 187
Total pages 13
Publisher S A E Inc.
Place of publication Warrendale, Pa.
Publication date 2011-12-04
ISSN 1946-3936
1946-3944
Summary Cold start driving cycles exhibit an increase in friction losses due to the low temperatures of metal and media compared to normal operating engine conditions. These friction losses are responsible for up to 10% penalty in fuel economy over the official drive cycles like the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC), where the temperature of the oil even at the end of the 1180 s of the drive cycle is below the fully warmed up values of between 100°C and 120°C. At engine oil temperatures below 100°C the water from the blow by condensates and dilutes the engine oil in the oil pan which negatively affects engine wear. Therefore engine oil temperatures above 100°C are desirable to minimize engine wear through blow by condensate. The paper presents a new technique to warm up the engine oil that significantly reduces the friction losses and therefore also reduces the fuel economy penalty during a 22°C cold start NEDC. Chassis dynamometer experiments demonstrated fuel economy improvements of over 7% as well as significant emission reductions by rapidly increasing the oil temperature. Oil temperatures were increased by up to 60°C during certain parts of the NEDC. It is shown how a very simple sensitivity analysis can be used to assess the relative size or efficiency of different heat transfer passes and the resulting fuel economy improvement potential of different heat recovery systems system. Due to its simplicity the method is very fast to use and therefore also very cost effective. The method demonstrated a very good correlation for the fuel consumption within ±1% compared to measurements on a vehicle chassis roll.
Language eng
DOI 10.4271/2011-01-0318
Field of Research 090201 Automotive Combustion and Fuel Engineering (incl Alternative/Renewable Fuels)
Socio Economic Objective 850702 Energy Conservation and Efficiency in Transport
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, SAE International
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040627

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.