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Productive pedagogies : is it an intelligible language for preservice teachers?

Zyngier, David and Gale, Trevor 2003, Productive pedagogies : is it an intelligible language for preservice teachers?, in Teachers as leaders : teacher education for a global profession: International yearbook on teacher education, 2003 World Assembly Proceedings, International Council on Education for Teaching, Wheeling, Ill., pp. 527-543.

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Title Productive pedagogies : is it an intelligible language for preservice teachers?
Author(s) Zyngier, David
Gale, Trevor
Conference name ICET World Assembly (48th : 2003 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 20-25 Jul. 2003
Title of proceedings Teachers as leaders : teacher education for a global profession: International yearbook on teacher education, 2003 World Assembly Proceedings
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2003
Conference series ICET World Assembly
Start page 527
End page 543
Total pages 17
Publisher International Council on Education for Teaching
Place of publication Wheeling, Ill.
Summary Australian teacher educators and teachers have become increasingly familiar with the notion of ‘Productive Pedagogies’, itself the product of longitudinal research on school reform recently undertaken in Queensland, Australia (Lingard et al., 2001a, , 2001b) . One of its strengths has been its efficacy for in-service teachers to use as a language to talk about their pedagogical work and hence a way of reclaiming some of the ground on what constitutes good teaching. In part, this can be attributed to the numerous observations of teachers’ classroom practice that informed the construction of Productive Pedagogies (PPs). That is, many teachers understand these as naming what ‘good’ teachers have always done. In this paper the value of PPs as a metalanguage for developing pre-service teachers’ knowledge and understanding of teaching is examined; whether PPs is a language that is intelligible for pre-service teachers without access to this prior teacher knowledge or whether its elements and dimensions merely constitute an isolated vocabulary. A case study of four pre-service teachers provides the context for this exploration and its empirical data. Drawing on their fieldwork observations of teaching practice, voiced in the language of PPs, the paper argues that PPs language is indeed useful in the development of pre-service teachers’ understanding of teaching, particularly in assisting them to name evidence of teachers’ recognition of and engagement with difference.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, ICET
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040873

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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