Let them eat cake : mobilising appetites for higher education

Gale, Trevor 2010, Let them eat cake : mobilising appetites for higher education, in Professorial Address : Knowledge Works Public Lecture Series, Bradley Forum, Hawke Building, University of South Australia, 3 June 2010., [University of South Australia], [Adelaide, S. Aust.], pp. 1-13.

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Title Let them eat cake : mobilising appetites for higher education
Author(s) Gale, Trevor
Conference name Knowledge Works Public Lecture Series (2010 : Adelaide, S. Aust.)
Conference location Adelaide, S. Aust.
Title of proceedings Professorial Address : Knowledge Works Public Lecture Series, Bradley Forum, Hawke Building, University of South Australia, 3 June 2010.
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series Knowledge Works Public Lecture Series
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher [University of South Australia]
Place of publication [Adelaide, S. Aust.]
Keyword(s) higher education
Australia
aspirations
low SES backgrounds
equity
voice
mobility
Summary The Australian Government has set two targets for the nation's universities: (i) increase the proportion of people from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds attending university, to 20 percent of all undergraduate students by 2020; and (ii) increase the proportion of 25 to 34 year-old Australians holding a bachelor's degree, to 40 percent by 2025. Both targets will require an increased effort by governments and universities to enable and encourage more people to access higher education, particularly more from low SES backgrounds. It will also require them to think differently about the problem. Three new concepts are now redefining the equity dimensions of higher education. Despite aspirations to expand the system, students' appetites for university are no longer a given. While universities are seeking to enrol different students in greater numbers, the challenge now is how to give greater voice to this difference. And the limited mobility of students from low SES backgrounds, including those in outer metropolitan and regional areas, is now the most significant indicator of their limited access to higher education and to social mobility. The paper outlines these new conceptions of student equity and how they are informing the research of the National Centre.
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category L2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed (minor conferences)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040882

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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