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Has equity's time come for VET? Observations and principles for equity policy and practice in Australian education

Gale, Trevor 2010, Has equity's time come for VET? Observations and principles for equity policy and practice in Australian education, in 19th National Vocational Education and Training Research ‘No Frills’ Conference, 8 July 2010, Central Institute of Technology, Perth, [NCVER], [Perth, W. A.], pp. 1-13.

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Title Has equity's time come for VET? Observations and principles for equity policy and practice in Australian education
Author(s) Gale, Trevor
Conference name National Vocational Education and Training Research Conference (19th : 2010 : Perth, W. A.)
Conference location Perth, W. A.
Conference dates 7-9 Jul. 2010
Title of proceedings 19th National Vocational Education and Training Research ‘No Frills’ Conference, 8 July 2010, Central Institute of Technology, Perth
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series National Vocational Education and Training Research Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher [NCVER]
Place of publication [Perth, W. A.]
Keyword(s) higher education
Australia
equity
vocational education and training (VET)
Summary Equity has a long history in education. When compulsory schooling was first introduced in industrialising nations in the mid 1800s, many advocates saw it as a way of improving the circumstances of the poorest and most disadvantaged in their communities. But access to schooling did not prove to be the great equaliser that some had hoped. Instead, it became central in the reproduction of social and economic inequalities (Bourdieu & Passeron 1977). High academic achievement became highly correlated with high socioeconomic status, and vice versa (Teese & Polesel 2003). In Australia, the Karmel Report (1973) proved to be a watershed moment in naming the equity problem in schooling and, among other things, gave rise to the Disadvantaged Schools Program (DSP): an attempt to level the playing field albeit by ‘running twice as hard’ (Connell at al. 1991). Almost two decades later, A Fair Chance for All (1990) signalled official concern for equity in Australian higher education. While access to university was not to be universal, it was to be equitable; all social groups in the Australian population were to be proportionally represented among its university students. Today, Australia is still grappling with the inequities in its schooling and higher education systems, highlighted by renewed interest by governments to address the issues. Although not of the same order of magnitude, there now appears to be an emerging policy agenda around equity in VET. Has equity’s time come for VET? This paper canvasses the history of equity in Australian schooling and higher education, with a view to drawing out principles to inform a rejuvenated equity agenda in vocational education and training.
Notes Keynote address

Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2010, NCVER
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040883

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.