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Transcriptional profiling of growth perturbations of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

Hu, Guangan, Cabrera, Ana, Kono, Maya, Mok, Sachel, Chaal, Balbir K., Haase, Silvia, Engelberg, Klemens, Cheemadan, Sabna, Spielmann, Tobias, Preiser, Peter R., Gilberger, Tim-W and Bozdech, Zbynek 2010, Transcriptional profiling of growth perturbations of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, Nature biotechnology, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 91-100, doi: 10.1038/nbt.1597.

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Title Transcriptional profiling of growth perturbations of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
Formatted title Transcriptional profiling of growth perturbations of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
Author(s) Hu, Guangan
Cabrera, Ana
Kono, Maya
Mok, Sachel
Chaal, Balbir K.
Haase, Silvia
Engelberg, Klemens
Cheemadan, Sabna
Spielmann, Tobias
Preiser, Peter R.
Gilberger, Tim-W
Bozdech, Zbynek
Journal name Nature biotechnology
Volume number 28
Issue number 1
Start page 91
End page 100
Publisher Nature Publishing
Place of publication New York
Publication date 2010-01
ISSN 1087-0156
Keyword(s) malaria
Summary Functions have yet to be defined for the majority of genes of Plasmodium falciparum, the agent responsible for the most serious form of human malaria. Here we report changes in P. falciparum gene expression induced by 20 compounds that inhibit growth of the schizont stage of the intraerythrocytic development cycle. In contrast with previous studies, which reported only minimal changes in response to chemically induced perturbations of P. falciparum growth, we find that ~59% of its coding genes display over three-fold changes in expression in response to at least one of the chemicals we tested. We use this compendium for guilt-by-association prediction of protein function using an interaction network constructed from gene co-expression, sequence homology, domain-domain and yeast two-hybrid data. The subcellular localizations of 31 of 42 proteins linked with merozoite invasion is consistent with their role in this process, a key target for malaria control. Our network may facilitate identification of novel antimalarial drugs and vaccines.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/nbt.1597
Field of Research 110803 Medical Parasitology
Socio Economic Objective 970103 Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Nature America
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040969

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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Created: Wed, 07 Dec 2011, 11:43:03 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

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