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Functional analysis of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens : implications for erythrocyte invasion and vaccine development

Cowman, Alan F., Baldi, Deborah L., Duraisingh, Manoj, Healer, Julie, Mills, Kerry E., O'Donnell, Rebecca A., Thompson, Jennifer, Triglia, Tony, Wickham, Mark E. and Crabb, Brendan S. 2002, Functional analysis of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens : implications for erythrocyte invasion and vaccine development, Philosophical transactions B. Biological sciences, vol. 357, no. 1417, pp. 25-33, doi: 10.1098/rstb.2001.1010.

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Title Functional analysis of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens : implications for erythrocyte invasion and vaccine development
Formatted title Functional analysis of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens : implications for erythrocyte invasion and vaccine development
Author(s) Cowman, Alan F.
Baldi, Deborah L.
Duraisingh, Manoj
Healer, Julie
Mills, Kerry E.
O'Donnell, Rebecca A.
Thompson, Jennifer
Triglia, Tony
Wickham, Mark E.
Crabb, Brendan S.
Journal name Philosophical transactions B. Biological sciences
Volume number 357
Issue number 1417
Start page 25
End page 33
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2002-01-29
ISSN 0962-8436
1471-2970
Keyword(s) malaria
vaccine antigens
targeted gene disruption
Plasmodium falciparum
proteins
Summary Malaria is a major human health problem and is responsible for over 2 million deaths per year. It is caused by a number of species of the genus Plasmodium, and Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of the most lethal form. Consequently, the development of a vaccine against this parasite is a priority. There are a number of stages of the parasite life cycle that are being targeted for the development of vaccines. Important candidate antigens include proteins on the surface of the asexual merozoite stage, the form that invades the host erythrocyte. The development of methods to manipulate the genome of Plasmodium species has enabled the construction of gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutants and provided new strategies to analyse the role of parasite proteins. This has provided new information on the role of merozoite antigens in erythrocyte invasion and also allows new approaches to address their potential as vaccine candidates.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2001.1010
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, The Royal Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041055

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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