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Hospital malnutrition : prevalence, identification and impact on patients and the healthcare system

Barker, Lisa A., Gout, Belinda S. and Crowe, Timothy C. 2011, Hospital malnutrition : prevalence, identification and impact on patients and the healthcare system, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 8, no. 2, Special Issue : Malnutrition & Public Health, pp. 514-527.

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Title Hospital malnutrition : prevalence, identification and impact on patients and the healthcare system
Alternative title Review : Hospital malnutrition : prevalence, identification and impact on patients and the healthcare system
Author(s) Barker, Lisa A.
Gout, Belinda S.
Crowe, Timothy C.
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Season Special Issue : Malnutrition & Public Health
Start page 514
End page 527
Publisher M D P I AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2011-02
ISSN 1660-4601
1661-7827
Keyword(s) diagnosis-related groups
economics
hospital
malnutrition
nutrition assessment
screening
Summary Malnutrition is a debilitating and highly prevalent condition in the acute hospital setting, with Australian and international studies reporting rates of approximately 40%. Malnutrition is associated with many adverse outcomes including depression of the immune system, impaired wound healing, muscle wasting, longer lengths of hospital stay, higher treatment costs and increased mortality. Referral rates for dietetic assessment and treatment of malnourished patients have proven to be suboptimal, thereby increasing the likelihood of developing such aforementioned complications. Nutrition risk screening using a validated tool is a simple technique to rapidly identify patients at risk of malnutrition, and provides a basis for prompt dietetic referrals. In Australia, nutrition screening upon hospital admission is not mandatory, which is of concern knowing that malnutrition remains under-reported and often poorly documented. Unidentified malnutrition not only heightens the risk of adverse complications for patients, but can potentially result in foregone reimbursements to the hospital through casemix-based funding schemes. It is strongly recommended that mandatory nutrition screening be widely adopted in line with published best-practice guidelines to effectively target and reduce the incidence of hospital malnutrition.
Notes Reproduced under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ “Published material can be re-used without obtaining permission as long as a correct citation to the original publication is given” http://www.mdpi.com/about/openaccess
Language eng
Field of Research 111101 Clinical and Sports Nutrition
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, M D P I AG
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041120

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.