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Reshaping dominant stories : a poststructuralist approach to online role play

Dracup, Mary 2010, Reshaping dominant stories : a poststructuralist approach to online role play, in HERDSA 2010 : Proceedings of the 33rd Annual HERDSA Conference, HERDSA, Milperra, N.S.W., pp. 1-10.

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Title Reshaping dominant stories : a poststructuralist approach to online role play
Author(s) Dracup, MaryORCID iD for Dracup, Mary orcid.org/0000-0002-5678-4145
Conference name Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Conference (33rd : 2010 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 6-9 Jul. 2010
Title of proceedings HERDSA 2010 : Proceedings of the 33rd Annual HERDSA Conference
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Conference
Start page 1
End page 10
Publisher HERDSA
Place of publication Milperra, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) online role play
role play
poststructuralist drama techniques
Summary Online role play is an increasingly popular teaching/learning technique in higher education (Wills & McDougall 2009) but there has been little research into ways a poststructuralist approach may be supported in this format. This paper describes two very different means of incorporating a poststructuralist approach into role plays in higher education to problematise dominant assumptions in the language and content of the subject matter. The first method was a series of interventions in a face-to-face role play in which medical students practised consultations with adolescent school students. The consultations were interrupted repeatedly with activities designed to interrogate assumptions and the school students acted as coaches to improve the medical students' technique. Although this role play was performed face-to-face, some of its activities may be redeveloped to suit an online role-playing format. The second method was a feature of an online role play involving Middle-East politics and journalism students, in which daily online newspapers provided a reflecting and distorting mirror to the political events simulated by the politics students. Indications of ways in which the two methods produced changes in understanding were gathered using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods: questionnaires, focus groups, interviews, participant observation and analysis of online discussions and artefacts.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2010
Related work DU:30042602
Copyright notice ©2010, Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041204

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Created: Wed, 04 Jan 2012, 12:43:06 EST by Mary Dracup

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.