Story as a vehicle for learning in online role play : a case study

Dracup, Mary 2009, Story as a vehicle for learning in online role play : a case study, in AARE 2009 : Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic., pp. 1-21.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Story as a vehicle for learning in online role play : a case study
Author(s) Dracup, MaryORCID iD for Dracup, Mary orcid.org/0000-0002-5678-4145
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research. Conference (2009 : Canberra, A.C.T.)
Conference location Canberra, A.C.T.
Conference dates 30 Nov. - 3 Dec. 2009
Title of proceedings AARE 2009 : Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 21
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Keyword(s) Online role play
simulation
politics education
Middle-East education
journalism education
story
higher education
Summary In online role plays, students are asked to engage with a story that serves as a metaphor for real-life experience as they learn and develop skills. However, practitioners rarely examine the characteristics and management of this story as factors in the students' engagement in and learning from the activity. In this paper I present findings from a recent case study which examines these factors in an online role play that has been named as an exemplar and has been run for 19 years in Australian and international universities to teach Middle East politics and journalism. Online role plays are increasingly popular in tertiary education, in forms ranging from simple text-based role plays to virtual learning environment activities and e-simulations. The role play I studied required students to communicate in role via simulated email messages and draw on real-life resources and daily simulated online newspaper publications produced by the journalism students rather than rely on information or automated interactions built into an interface. This relatively simple format enabled me to observe clearly the impact of the technique's basic design elements. I studied both the story elements of plot, character and setting and the non-story elements of assessment, group work and online format. The data collection methods include analysis of student emails in the role play, a questionnaire, a focus group, interviews and the journal I kept as a participant-observer in the role play. In evaluating the qualities and impact of story elements I drew upon established aesthetic principles for drama and poststructuralist drama education.
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2009
Related work DU:30042602
Copyright notice ©2009, Australian Association for Research in Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041206

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Institute of Teaching and Learning
Higher Education Research Group
Connect to link resolver
 
Link to Related Work
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 159 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 04 Jan 2012, 12:59:50 EST by Mary Dracup

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.