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Association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and propensity to anxiety in an Australian population-based longitudinal study of adolescent health

Olsson, Craig A., Anney, Richard J. L., Lofti-Miri, Mehrnoush, Byrnes, Graham B., Williamson, Robert and Patton, George C. 2005, Association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and propensity to anxiety in an Australian population-based longitudinal study of adolescent health, Psychiatric genetics, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 109-115, doi: 10.1097/00041444-200506000-00007.

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Title Association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and propensity to anxiety in an Australian population-based longitudinal study of adolescent health
Author(s) Olsson, Craig A.ORCID iD for Olsson, Craig A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Anney, Richard J. L.
Lofti-Miri, Mehrnoush
Byrnes, Graham B.
Williamson, Robert
Patton, George C.
Journal name Psychiatric genetics
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 109
End page 115
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2005-06
ISSN 0955-8829
1473-5873
Keyword(s) adolescent
anxiety
depression
neuroticism
catechol-O-methyltransferase
population sample
longitudinal design
Summary Objectives: Catechol-O-methyltransferase plays a central role in the metabolism of biogenic amines such as norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin. Functional studies have demonstrated a dose relationship between Val158Met genotypes and catechol-O-methyltransferase activity. Compared with the Val158Val genotype, the Val158Met and Met158Met genotypes result in two- and four-fold reductions in catechol-O-methyltransferase activity, respectively. Two recent reports have observed the association between the Met158Met genotype and risk of anxiety in adult populations. We examined the association between the Val158Met genotypes and propensity to anxiety across adolescence.

Methods: Participants were drawn from an eight-wave study of the mental and behavioural health of over 2000 young Australians followed from 14 to 24 years of age (Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study, 1992 to present). DNA was received from 962 participants using a cheek swab collection method.

Results: The odds of reporting persistent episodic anxiety (phobic avoidance, panic attacks) were doubled among carriers of the Met158Met genotype (odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.4, P=0.014). A dose relationship between additional copies of the Met158 allele and persistent episodic anxiety was also observed (1.5, 1.1-1.94, P=0.007). Stratification by sex showed that the risk effect of the Met158 allele was among females only. No association was observed for measures of neuroticism, persistent generalized anxiety, or a composite measure of psychiatric distress.

Conclusion: These data replicate previous findings suggesting association between the Val158Met polymorphism and specific expressions of anxiety among females.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/00041444-200506000-00007
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041318

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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