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Association between 5-HTTLPR genotypes and persisting patterns of anxiety and alcohol use : results from a 10-year longitudinal study of adolescent mental health

Olsson, C. A., Byrnes, G. B., Lotfi-Miri, M., Collins, V., Williamson, B., Patton, C. and Anney, R. J. L. 2005, Association between 5-HTTLPR genotypes and persisting patterns of anxiety and alcohol use : results from a 10-year longitudinal study of adolescent mental health, Molecular psychiatry, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 868-876, doi: 10.1038/sj.mp.4001677.

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Title Association between 5-HTTLPR genotypes and persisting patterns of anxiety and alcohol use : results from a 10-year longitudinal study of adolescent mental health
Author(s) Olsson, C. A.ORCID iD for Olsson, C. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Byrnes, G. B.
Lotfi-Miri, M.
Collins, V.
Williamson, B.
Patton, C.
Anney, R. J. L.
Journal name Molecular psychiatry
Volume number 10
Issue number 9
Start page 868
End page 876
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, U. K.
Publication date 2005-09
ISSN 1359-4184
1476-5578
Keyword(s) 5-HTTLPR
gene–environment interaction
adolescence; anxiety
alcohol
Summary The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) encodes a transmembrane protein that plays an important role in regulating serotonergic neurotransmission and related aspects of mood and behaviour. The short allele of a 44 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (S-allele) within the promoter region of the 5-HTT gene (5-HTTLPR) confers lower transcriptional activity relative to the long allele (L-allele) and may act to modify the risk of serotonin-mediated outcomes such as anxiety and substance use behaviours. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (or not) 5-HTTLPR genotypes moderate known associations between attachment style and adolescent anxiety and alcohol use outcomes. Participants were drawn from an eight-wave study of the mental and behavioural health of a cohort of young Australians followed from 14 to 24 years of age (Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study, 1992 - present). No association was observed within low-risk attachment settings. However, within risk settings for heightened anxiety (ie, insecurely attached young people), the odds of persisting ruminative anxiety (worry) decreased with each additional copy of the S-allele (B30% per allele: OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62–0.97, P¼0.029). Within risk settings for binge drinking (ie, securely attached young people), the odds of reporting persisting high-dose alcohol consumption (bingeing) decreased with each additional copy of the S-allele (B35% per allele: OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.64–0.86, Po0.001). Our data suggest that the S-allele is likely to be important in psychosocial development, particularly in those settings that increase risk of anxiety and alcohol use problems.
Notes First published online 26 April 2005
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/sj.mp.4001677
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041322

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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