You are not logged in.

Identification and genetic determination of an early life risk disposition for depressive disorder : atypical stress-related behaviour in early childhood

van Eekelen, J. Anke M., Olsson, Craig A., Ellis, Justine A., Ang, Wei, Hutchinson, Delyse, Zubrick, Stephen R. and Pennell, Craig E. 2011, Identification and genetic determination of an early life risk disposition for depressive disorder : atypical stress-related behaviour in early childhood, Australian journal of psychology, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 6-17, doi: 10.1111/j.1742-9536.2011.00002.x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Identification and genetic determination of an early life risk disposition for depressive disorder : atypical stress-related behaviour in early childhood
Author(s) van Eekelen, J. Anke M.
Olsson, Craig A.ORCID iD for Olsson, Craig A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Ellis, Justine A.
Ang, Wei
Hutchinson, DelyseORCID iD for Hutchinson, Delyse orcid.org/0000-0003-3221-7143
Zubrick, Stephen R.
Pennell, Craig E.
Journal name Australian journal of psychology
Volume number 63
Issue number 1
Start page 6
End page 17
Total pages 12
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Place of publication Oxford, U. K.
Publication date 2011-03
ISSN 0004-9530
1742-9536
Keyword(s) corticolimbic neurotransmission
GWAS
HPA axis
mood
systems biology
temperament
the Raine Study
Summary Progress in psychiatric genetics has been slow despite evidence of high heritability for most mental disorders. We argue that greater use of early detectable intermediate traits (endophenotypes) with the highest likely aetiological significance to depression, rather than complex clinical phenotypes, would be advantageous. Longitudinal data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study were used to identify an early life behavioural endophenotype for atypical hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenocortical function in adolescence, a neurobiological indicator of anxiety and depression. A set of descriptors representing rigid and reactive behaviour at age 1 year discriminated those in the top 20% of the free salivary cortisol exposure at age 17 years. Genetic association analysis revealed a male-sensitive effect to variation in three specific single nucleotide polymorphisms within selected genes underpinning the overall stress response. Furthermore, support for a polygenic effect on stress-related behaviour in childhood is presented.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1742-9536.2011.00002.x
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, The Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041330

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 294 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 06 Jan 2012, 14:18:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.