Contact electrification induced by monolayer modification of a surface and relation to acid-base interactions

Horn, R. G., Smith, D. T. and Grabbe, A. 1993, Contact electrification induced by monolayer modification of a surface and relation to acid-base interactions, Nature, vol. 366, no. 6454, pp. 442-443.

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Title Contact electrification induced by monolayer modification of a surface and relation to acid-base interactions
Author(s) Horn, R. G.
Smith, D. T.
Grabbe, A.
Journal name Nature
Volume number 366
Issue number 6454
Start page 442
End page 443
Total pages 2
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 1993-12-02
ISSN 0028-0836
1476-4687
Keyword(s) Adhesion
Chemisorption
Electric charge
Electrochemistry
Electrostatics
Organic coatings
Surface phenomena
Surfaces
Summary Electrical charge separation following contact between two materials (contact electrification or the triboelectric effect) is well known to occur between different materials as a consequence of their different electronic structures. Here we show that the phenomenon occurs between two surfaces of the same material if one is coated with a single chemisorbed monolayer. We use the surface force apparatus to study contact electrification and adhesion between two silica surfaces, one coated with an amino-silane. The presence of this monolayer results in significantly enhanced adhesion between the surfaces, owing to electrostatic attraction following contact electrification, in accord with Derjaguin's electrostatic theory of adhesion. At the same time, the observed increase in adhesion is consistent with Fowkes' acid-base model (in which acid-base interactions between surface groups are considered to be the predominant factor determining adhesion), as the monolayer converts the originally acidic silica surface to a basic (amine-terminated) one. These observations demonstrate a link between acid- base interactions and contact electrification.

Electrical charge separation following contact between two materials (contact electrification or the triboelectric effect) is well known to occur between different materials as a consequence of their different electronic structures. Here we show that the phenomenon occurs between two surfaces of the same material if one is coated with a single chemisorbed monolayer. We use the surface force apparatus to study contact electrification and adhesion between two silica surfaces, one coated with an amino-silane. The presence of this monolayer results in significantly enhanced adhesion between the surfaces, owing to electrostatic attraction following contact electrification, in accord with Derjaguin's electrostatic theory of adhesion. At the same time, the observed increase in adhesion is consistent with Fowkes' acid-base model (in which acid-base interactions between surface groups are considered to be the predominant factor determining adhesion), as the monolayer converts the originally acidic silica surface to a basic (amine-terminated) one. These observations demonstrate a link between acid-base interactions and contact electrification.
Language eng
Field of Research 029999 Physical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
HERDC Research category C4.1 Letter or note
Copyright notice ©1993, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041471

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