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Putting the Australian Labor Party in international perspective

Scott, Andrew 2003, Putting the Australian Labor Party in international perspective, in APSA 2004 : Proceedings of the Australian Political Studies Association 2003, APSA, [Hobart, Tas.], pp. 1-25.

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Title Putting the Australian Labor Party in international perspective
Author(s) Scott, Andrew
Conference name Australian Political Studies Association. Conference (2003 : Hobart, Tasmania)
Conference location Hobart, Tasmania
Conference dates 29 Sep.-1 Oct. 2003
Title of proceedings APSA 2004 : Proceedings of the Australian Political Studies Association 2003
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2003
Start page 1
End page 25
Total pages 25
Publisher APSA
Place of publication [Hobart, Tas.]
Summary This paper assesses the Australian Labor Party's current debates over future directions with reference to attempts by the left of centre political parties in other western nations, especially in Western Europe, to deal with the end of the economic "golden age" since the early 1970s and the widespread resurgence of neo-liberal ideologies since the late 1970s. The dominant recent view of such comparisons has been through the ideological lens of the "Third Way". This vision however tends not to see relevant variations between the experiences of social democratic parties in individual Western European nations as they have sought to deal with adverse circumstances since the early 1970s. Nor does the Third Way view sufficiently extend to the widely varying background landscapes: that is, the different levels of historical achievement by left of centre parties in the different nations. Some social democratic parties in European countries are pursuing more progressive political agendas than the British Labour Party under Tony Blair and they are starting from a very different basis of policy achievement and political strength than either the British or Australian labour parties. The nature and extent of these international differences need now to be highlighted from an Australian political perspective in order to better inform the current debate about the range of options for the ALP and the current comparative condition of the Australian party system. As part of this analysis, the relationship between the erosion of the traditional blue-collar support bases of the major left of centre parties in various nations, amid economic restructuring and challenges to traditional immigration patterns, and the rise of support for anti-immigrant policies and parties, need to be carefully examined and evaluated.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 160603 Comparative Government and Politics
Socio Economic Objective 940203 Political Systems
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, APSA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041529

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of International and Political Studies
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.