Building human rights into disability policy : lessons from The Equipping Inclusion Studies

Layton, Natasha and Wilson, Erin 2011, Building human rights into disability policy : lessons from The Equipping Inclusion Studies, in Proceedings of the 2nd From Strength to Strength Conference : Human Rights, [The Conference], [Melbourne, Vic].

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Title Building human rights into disability policy : lessons from The Equipping Inclusion Studies
Formatted title Building human rights into disability policy : lessons from The Equipping Inclusion Studies
Author(s) Layton, Natasha
Wilson, Erin
Conference name National Disability Services and Disability Professionals Victoria From Strength to Strength Conference (2nd : 2011 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 22-23 March 2011
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2nd From Strength to Strength Conference : Human Rights
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series From Strength to Strength Conference Annual Conference
Publisher [The Conference]
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic]
Keyword(s) disability policy
human rights
assistive technology
Notes Building human rights into disability policy: lessons from The Equipping Inclusion Studies. Natasha Layton and Dr Erin Wilson Between 2008 – 2010, Deakin University was commissioned to undertake two studies, combined in the report The Equipping Inclusion Studies (Layton, Colgan, Wilson, Moodie & Carter, 2010), by the Victorian Aids and Equipment Action Alliance (AEAA). These studies sought to provide an evidence base to effect improvements in policy and program provision in relation to assistive technology (AT) funding in Victoria. These studies are among the first to utilise the recent United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, along with the Victorian Department of Human Services Quality Framework, to evaluate the effectiveness of policy in achieving the outcomes required within these policy frameworks. The studies found significant failures in relation to the achievement of the articles of the UNCRPD as well as the sixteen life areas identified as outcomes by the DHS Quality Framework, resulting from the lack of provision of AT. The lack of provision of AT is underpinned by fundamental design flaws in government policy regarding the funding and provision of AT. This paper presents the evidence for change in regard to the funding and provision of AT, and identifies clear elements of more effective policy based on the now known requirements of people with disabilities relying on AT to participate in a wide range of life areas of their choice, and as is their right. The methods of analysis used by this research, in particular the use of the UNCRPD, also points to the need for work to further develop and disseminate such methods.
Language eng
Field of Research 160508 Health Policy
160512 Social Policy
Socio Economic Objective 940101 Ability and Disability
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041560

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