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Older women crafting ethical subjectivities in rural places

Bay, Uschi, Maidment, Jane and Courtney, Michelle 2011, Older women crafting ethical subjectivities in rural places, in TASA 2011 : Local Lives/Global Networks : The Australian Sociological Association annual conference, Australian Sociological Association, [Newcastle, N. S. W.].

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Title Older women crafting ethical subjectivities in rural places
Author(s) Bay, Uschi
Maidment, Jane
Courtney, Michelle
Conference name The Australian Sociological Association annual conference (2011 : Newcastle, N. S. W.)
Conference location Newcastle, N. S. W.
Conference dates 28 Nov-1 Dec. 2011
Title of proceedings TASA 2011 : Local Lives/Global Networks : The Australian Sociological Association annual conference
Editor(s) Threadgold, Steven
Kirby, Emma
Germov, John
Publication date 2011
Conference series The Australian Sociological Association annual conference
Publisher Australian Sociological Association
Place of publication [Newcastle, N. S. W.]
Keyword(s) care of self
Foucault
subjectivities
rural women
craft
Summary Over the last two years my colleagues and I conducted research conversations with older women living in rural Victoria about the meaning of craft in their lives. These conversations are the basis for our speculations on how women constitute ethical subjectivities through specific craft activities and through their engagement with Country Women Association (CWA) craft groups. The CWA is recognised as a ‘community of practice’ with local, regional, state, national and global networks, aiming to improve the lives of rural people. The focus of this paper, however, is on how ethical subjectivities by rural women are fashioned through specific involvements in craft activities and craft groups. I aim to elaborate on how Foucault’s later work on the ‘Care of the Self’ may open possibilities, even if limited, for understanding the complex ways women take up subject positions in interaction with historical, political, economic and social arrangements, and through engagement with specific institutions. For Foucault, ‘care of the self’ is an inherently social practice. Currently, modern power relations incite us to relate to our selves through self confessional and self-disciplining technologies. Could a differently constituted mode of self-care be drawn from the Ancient Greeks to offer us ideas for enacting personal and social transformations today?
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780646567792
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041562

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.