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Early age alcohol use and later alcohol problems in adolescents : individual and peer mediators in a bi-national study

Mason, W. Alex, Toumbourou, John W., Herrenkohl, Todd I., Hemphill, Sheryl A., Catalano, Richard F. and Patton, George C. 2011, Early age alcohol use and later alcohol problems in adolescents : individual and peer mediators in a bi-national study, Psychology of addictive behaviors, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 625-633, doi: 10.1037/a0023320.

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Title Early age alcohol use and later alcohol problems in adolescents : individual and peer mediators in a bi-national study
Author(s) Mason, W. Alex
Toumbourou, John W.ORCID iD for Toumbourou, John W. orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Herrenkohl, Todd I.
Hemphill, Sheryl A.
Catalano, Richard F.
Patton, George C.
Journal name Psychology of addictive behaviors
Volume number 25
Issue number 4
Start page 625
End page 633
Total pages 9
Publisher American Psychological Association
Place of publication Washington, D. C.
Publication date 2011-12
ISSN 0893-164X
1939-1501
Keyword(s) alcohol use problems
mediation
self-regulation
cross-national
peers
Summary This paper examines whether there is cross-national similarity in the longitudinal relationship between early age alcohol use and adolescent alcohol problems. Potential mechanisms underlying this relationship also are examined, testing adolescent alcohol use, low self-regulation, and peer deviance as possible mediators. Students (N = 1,945) participating in the International Youth Development Study, a longitudinal panel survey study, responded to questions on alcohol use and influencing factors, and were followed annually over a 3-year period from 2002 to 2004 (98% retention rate). State-representative, community student samples were recruited in grade 7 in Washington State, United States (US, n = 961, 78% of those eligible; Mage = 13.09, SD = .44) and Victoria, Australia (n = 984, 76% of those eligible; Mage = 12.93, SD = .41). Analyses were conducted using multiple-group structural equation modeling. In both states, early age alcohol use (age 13) had a small but statistically significant association with subsequent alcohol problems (age 15). Overall, there was little evidence for mediation of early alcohol effects. Low self-regulation prospectively predicted peer deviance, alcohol use, and alcohol problems in both states. Peer deviance was more positively related to alcohol use and low self-regulation among students in Victoria compared to students in Washington State. The small but persistent association of early age alcohol use with alcohol problems across both samples is consistent with efforts to delay alcohol initiation to help prevent problematic alcohol use. Self-regulation was an important influence, supporting the need to further investigate the developmental contribution of neurobehavioral disinhibition.
Language eng
DOI 10.1037/a0023320
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2011
Copyright notice ©2011, American Psychological Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041727

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Mon, 23 Jan 2012, 14:00:07 EST by Penny Andrews

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