Growing community : the impact of the Stephanie Alexander kitchen garden program on the social and learning environment in primary schools

Block, Karen, Gibbs, Lisa, Staiger, Petra K., Gold, Lisa, Johnson, Britt, Macfarlane, Susie, Long, Caroline and Townsend, Mardie 2012, Growing community : the impact of the Stephanie Alexander kitchen garden program on the social and learning environment in primary schools, Health education and behavior, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 419-432.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Growing community : the impact of the Stephanie Alexander kitchen garden program on the social and learning environment in primary schools
Author(s) Block, Karen
Gibbs, Lisa
Staiger, Petra K.
Gold, Lisa
Johnson, Britt
Macfarlane, Susie
Long, Caroline
Townsend, Mardie
Journal name Health education and behavior
Volume number 39
Issue number 4
Start page 419
End page 432
Total pages 14
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Publication date 2012-08
ISSN 1090-1981
1552-6127
Keyword(s) confidence
education
engagement
evaluation
mixed methods
social connections
Summary This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has a positive impact on student engagement, social connections, and confidence within and beyond the school gates. Primary evidence for the research question came from qualitative data collected from students, parents, teachers, volunteers, school principals, and specialist staff through interviews, focus groups, and participant observations. This was supported by analyses of quantitative data on child quality of life, cooperative behaviors, teacher perceptions of the school environment, and school-level educational outcome and absenteeism data. Results showed that some of the program attributes valued most highly by study participants included increased student engagement and confidence, opportunities for experiential and integrated learning, teamwork, building social skills, and connections and links between schools and their communities. In this analysis, quantitative findings failed to support findings from the primary analysis. Limitations as well as benefits of a mixed-methods approach to evaluation of complex community interventions are discussed.
Language eng
Field of Research 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 930301 Assessment and Evaluation of Curriculum
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Sage Publications
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042007

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 298 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 03 Feb 2012, 14:34:03 EST by Penny Andrews

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.