Should we teach an old game new tricks?

Hardy, Mat and Totman, Sally 2011, Should we teach an old game new tricks?, in ascilite 2011 : Changing demands, changing directions : Proceedings of the Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Conference, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas., pp. 562-570.

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Title Should we teach an old game new tricks?
Author(s) Hardy, Mat
Totman, Sally
Conference name Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Conference (28th : 2011 : Hobart, Tas.)
Conference location Hobart, Tas.
Conference dates 4–7 Dec. 2011
Title of proceedings ascilite 2011 : Changing demands, changing directions : Proceedings of the Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Conference
Editor(s) Williams, G.
Statham, P.
Brown, N.
Cleland, B.
Publication date 2011
Start page 562
End page 570
Total pages 9
Publisher University of Tasmania
Place of publication Hobart, Tas.
Keyword(s) role-play
social media
simulation
student engagement
politics
Middle East
Summary The Middle East Politics Simulation (MEPS) is a simulation of diplomacy and political tension in the Middle East. This online role-play exercise is aimed at providing students with an improved level of understanding of the political dimensions of the region. Having been run since 1993, the MEPS has not had any major updates to its platform in all those years. However, as such a mature online entity there is the question of whether the MEPS will continue to engage students as their expectations of what constitutes an online role-playing environment became steadily raised by their familiarity with more graphically immersive platforms. The reliance on social media tools for students and political figures to use as conduits for communication is also unrepresented in the MEPS and the subject of some student dissatisfaction in previous years. This research assesses student attitudes towards the MEPS with an eye to balancing the demands of technology, functionality, equity of experience, security and, most importantly, learning outcomes.
ISBN 9781862956445
Language eng
Field of Research 130205 Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl Economics, Business and Management)
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2011, Mat Hardy and Sally Totman
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042180

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of International and Political Studies
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