Histological health indices : linking complex pollutant exposure with tissue alteration in sand flathead Platycephalus bassensis

Mondon, J., Davis, S. and Howitt, J. 2011, Histological health indices : linking complex pollutant exposure with tissue alteration in sand flathead Platycephalus bassensis, in Enviro Tox 2011 : Sharing knowledge for a healthier environment, SETAC-AU, [Darwin, N.T.], pp. 42-42.

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Title Histological health indices : linking complex pollutant exposure with tissue alteration in sand flathead Platycephalus bassensis
Formatted title Histological health indices : linking complex pollutant exposure with tissue alteration in sand flathead Platycephalus bassensis
Author(s) Mondon, J.
Davis, S.
Howitt, J.
Conference name Enviro Tox (2011 : Darwin, N.T.)
Conference location Darwin, N.T.
Conference dates 17-20 Apr. 2011
Title of proceedings Enviro Tox 2011 : Sharing knowledge for a healthier environment
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series Enviro Tox
Start page 42
End page 42
Total pages 1
Publisher SETAC-AU
Place of publication [Darwin, N.T.]
Keyword(s) histology
pollution
environment
sand flathead
Summary Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, is a pollutant-impacted environment that is extensively fished both professionally and recreationally. Consumption of contaminated fish represents a potential threat to human health, and fish exposed to environmental contaminants may themselves be affected in a similar fashion. This study describes a fish health index based on histological alterations identified in multiple organs of the sand flathead Platycephalus bassensis. Alterations were evident in tissues from all individuals assessed, with common pathologies observed in the gills, skin, kidney, liver and spleen. Alterations commonly present included necrosis, melanomacrophage centres, inflammation and multiple alterations of the gill epithelium (e.g. hyperplasia and hypertrophy). Fish health, calculated using severity of histological alterations, differed significantly across Port Phillip Bay, with heavily industrialized regions of Altona and St. Helens showing greatest alteration prevalence across multiple organs. This study indicates that the health of P.bassensis from Altona, St. Helens, and Mornington to a lesser extent, are currently compromised, potentially due to complex pollutant exposures which require further investigation
Language eng
Field of Research 050204 Environmental Impact Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 960503 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Coastal and Estuarine Environments
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042271

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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