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Integrating knowledge systems in local coastal management; the case of an estuary entrance management support system (EEMSS) in Australia

O'Toole, Kevin, Keneley, Monica, Arundel, Helen, Macgarvey, Anna, Quinn, Gerry, Coffey, Brian and Mondon, Julie 2011, Integrating knowledge systems in local coastal management; the case of an estuary entrance management support system (EEMSS) in Australia, in ACES 2011 : Conservation Conflicts : Strategies for Coping With a changing World, [Aberdeen Centre for Environmental Sustainability (ACES)], [Aberdeen, Scotland], pp. 3-3.

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Title Integrating knowledge systems in local coastal management; the case of an estuary entrance management support system (EEMSS) in Australia
Author(s) O'Toole, Kevin
Keneley, MonicaORCID iD for Keneley, Monica orcid.org/0000-0002-2569-4948
Arundel, Helen
Macgarvey, Anna
Quinn, Gerry
Coffey, Brian
Mondon, JulieORCID iD for Mondon, Julie orcid.org/0000-0002-0643-7540
Conference name International Science and Policy Conference (2011 : Aberdeen, Scotland)
Conference location Aberdeen, Scotland
Conference dates 22-24 Aug. 2011
Title of proceedings ACES 2011 : Conservation Conflicts : Strategies for Coping With a changing World
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series International Science and Policy Conference
Start page 3
End page 3
Publisher [Aberdeen Centre for Environmental Sustainability (ACES)]
Place of publication [Aberdeen, Scotland]
Keyword(s) coastal resources
sustainability
coastal management
Estuary Entrance Management Support System
EEMSS
Summary The management of social, economic, and ecological assets in coastal zones is fundamental to the maintenance and sustainability of coastal resources. A significant issue in this discussion is the role of governance structures. In Australia the governance of the coastal zone includes a range of institutional authorities, processes, and procedures that set the context for decision making about coastal management. As well as the formal institutional arrangements there is also a maze of other interests such as development commissions, NGOs, Indigenous Native Title holders and other stakeholders including recreational interests. A major issue for governance arrangements is the considerable gap that often exists between how those interests interpret and develop their positions especially when the knowledge is derived from different systems – scientific, managerial, lay and indigenous. This paper will explore the development of an Estuary Entrance Management Support System (EEMSS) in south west Victoria Australia. The EEMSS is a decision support tool to assist estuary managers in determining whether to artificially open a river mouth. A significant part of the process adopted was community participation which involved a ‘steps’ approach to engage local community groups and landholders. It is the process of engaging different knowledge systems in a meaningful conversation that has led to a system that now gains support from all of the stakeholders in the management of different estuaries. The paper will discuss the processes that surround the EEMSS and outline some lessons that arise in context of the ‘project state’.
Language eng
Field of Research 050209 Natural Resource Management
050199 Ecological Applications not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 960503 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Coastal and Estuarine Environments
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042272

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