Conservation of urban historic districts in China : present models of integration and utilization of historic resources and challenges for authenticity

Geng, Zhe and Jones, David 2011, Conservation of urban historic districts in China : present models of integration and utilization of historic resources and challenges for authenticity, in WPSC 2011 : Proceedings of the 3rd World Planning Schools Congress, World Planning Schools Congress, [Perth, W. A.], pp. 1-18.

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Title Conservation of urban historic districts in China : present models of integration and utilization of historic resources and challenges for authenticity
Author(s) Geng, Zhe
Jones, David
Conference name World Planning Schools Congress (3rd : 2011 : Perth, W. A.)
Conference location Perth, W. A.
Conference dates 4-8 Jul. 2011
Title of proceedings WPSC 2011 : Proceedings of the 3rd World Planning Schools Congress
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series World Planning Schools Congress
Start page 1
End page 18
Publisher World Planning Schools Congress
Place of publication [Perth, W. A.]
Keyword(s) historic districts
China
authenticity conservation
methods
historic resources
Summary Chinese urban historic districts retain abundant urban traditional features, local characteristics and historic architecture. They not only gather and display urban cultural heritage but extend and develop urban historic culture and social traditions. In 1964 the “Venice Charter” expanded the concept and scope of historical and cultural heritage conservation from individual building heritage, historical sites comprising heritage buildings and historical environments to whole historic districts. At the same time, authenticity was adopted as a principle of heritage conservation. In 1994 the Nara Document on Authenticity confirmed that authenticity is of great importance to the conservation of cultural heritage. In 2003, “The Hoi An Declaration on Conservation of Historic Districts of Asia” reinforced the significance, integrity and authenticity of historic district conservation. In China, with the accelerated urbanization process and improved living conditions of urban residents, the unique values and historic and cultural heritage of historic districts is being destroyed. Considerable historic and cultural heritage has been reconstructed, leading to the loss of authenticity of these historic districts. This paper provides an overview of the Chinese situation. It highlights the problems and demonstrates a clear need to protect the authenticity of these historic districts. Authenticty is evaluated against various Chinese conservation of historic districts having regard to international experience and methods. As a result, it will be demonstrated that conservation modes of authenticity of urban historic districts in China and historic resources should be employed to ensure: 1) the restoration and conservation of historic architecture; 2) the preservation and renovation of old spaces and structures; 3) the integration and coordination of historic and new buildings; and the 4) the continuation and succession of historic culture and local tradition.
ISBN 9781740522373
Language eng
Field of Research 120199 Architecture not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 950399 Heritage not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
HERDC collection year 2011
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042287

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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